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Collection
Lindbergh, Anne Morrow, 1906-2001
The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, writings, childhood, school and college materials, housekeeping and social records, reports, memoranda and correspondence from the many organizations in which Anne Morrow Lindbergh took an active interest. Also included are voluminous mail from members of her reading public and memorabilia, both objects sent by admirers and items collected by her on her travels. The death of Charles Lindbergh in 1974 is documented by mail from friends, members of the public and organizations. Anne Morrow Lindbergh's writings make up the largest part of the papers and include her diaries (1929-1972, 1982-1988), drafts of her books, working notebooks, speeches, articles and stories, and published reviews of her work. Also in the papers are printed copies of her publications. Her personal correspondence with friends and family runs over many years. Correspondence with friends includes letters exchanged with Anne Carrel, Harry Guggenheim, Corliss Lamont, Harold and Nigel Nicolson, Vita Sackville-West, Igor Sikorsky, Truman and Katherine Smith, Helen and Kurt Wolff, Jean Stafford and Mary Ellen Chase. Her family correspondence contains letters exchanged by Anne Morrow Lindbergh and members of her immediate family as well as members of the Morrow, Lindbergh and Cutter families.
Collection
Stokes, Anson Phelps, 1874-1958
The papers consist of correspondence, writings, subject files, memorabilia, photographs, financial records, and other papers detailing the professional career and personal life of Anson Phelps Stokes and family members, including Olivia, Caroline and Helen Stokes. Papers relating to Anson Phelps Stokes document his work with prominent educators, reformers, religious leaders, businessmen, and politicians. Stokes's work on behalf of black education, social issues, and the Phelps-Stokes Fund are detailed. His religious activities, Yale University work, and family interests are also represented, as are Stokes's work on behalf of the Portsmouth Treaty of 1905 and the Yale-China Association. Papers relating to Helen Phelps Stokes include material relating to the Socialist Party and the National Civil Liberties Bureau.
Collection
Shedd, Clarence Prouty, 1887-
The collection consists of correspondence, writings, and source material related almost entirely to Shedd's professional involvement in religious work among college and university students. Clarence Prouty Shedd received the B.A. degree in 1909 and the M.A. degree in 1914, both from Clark University, and earned a B.D. in 1925 and a Ph.D. in 1932 from Yale University. He taught in the fields of Christian methods and religion in higher education at Yale University from 1923 to 1955.
Collection
Eddy, Sherwood, 1871-1963
The collection consists of correspondence, writings, collected material, personal items, and memorabilia that document the activities and associations of George Sherwood Eddy throughout his career as a YMCA secretary, seminar leader, author, lecturer, and evangelist. George Sherwood Eddy was born in Leavenworth, Kansas on January 19, 1871. He earned a Ph.B. degree from Sheffield Scientific School, Yale University in 1891, attended Union Theological Seminary and graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary. Eddy worked for the YMCA, Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions, and American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. He was appointed YMCA secretary for Asia in 1911. Eddy wrote and published numerous books and pamphlets from 1895-1955. He died in Jacksonville, Illinois on November 4, 1963.
Collection
Sherrill, Henry Knox, 1890-1980
These papers relate primarily to the life and work of Henry Knox Sherrill and his son Henry Williams Sherrill. The papers document Henry Knox Sherrill's career as an Episcopal rector, Bishop of Massachusetts, and Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, his wartime chaplaincy work (in France during World War I and as Chairman of the United States General Commission on Chaplains during World War II), his ecumenical leadership as President of the National Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches, and his service to institutions such as Yale University and Massachusetts General Hospital. Henry Williams Sherrill was a graduate of Yale College, Union Theological Seminary and Virginia Theological Seminary. He was an Episcopal priest who served parishes in Michigan and Ohio and for many years was chairman of the Cheswick Center, a research and education trust for study and improvement in nonprofit governance.
Collection
Latourette, Kenneth Scott, 1884-1968
The papers contain extensive documentation of Latourette's personal life, scholarly activities, and involvement in various organizations. Latourette was a professor of missions and Oriental history at Yale University. He held leadership positions in the American Baptist Convention and Foreign Mission Society, American Historical Association, Far Eastern Association, International Committee of Y.M.C.A.'s, Japan International Christian University Foundation, United Board for Christian Colleges in China, World Council of Churches, and Yale-China Association.
Collection
Pope, Liston, 1909-1974
The papers document Pope's career and thought. They are primarily related to his professional work, but personal insights are also available, particularly in the correspondence with his wife and friends. The collection provides information about theological education in the United States, the activities of the ecumenical movement during the 1950s, the relationship of the church (particularly the Congregational denomination) to social concerns such as labor and race relations during the 1950s. Liston Corlando Pope was born on September 6, 1909 in Thomasville, North Carolina. He was educated at Duke University (A.B., 1929; B.D., 1932) and Yale University (Ph.D., 1940). He served as pastor of churches in North Carolina and New Haven, Connecticut (1932-1938), professor of Social Ethics (1938-1973) and Dean (1949-1962) of Yale Divinity School, author and editor. He was active in the Congregational Christian Churches denomination (1850-1960) and the ecumenical movement, particularly the World Council of Churches, and in organizations involved in theological education. He died in Norway in April, 1974.
Collection
Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions
The papers document the activities of the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions and provide valuable information on various aspects of American religious life during the period 1886-1964. Religious conditions on American college and university campuses are documented. Vast files of student volunteer application, information and health examination blanks provide personal data on thousands of prospective missionaries which is of potential interest to genealogists, biographers and historians. The financial records and correspondence provide documentation related to philanthropic support of religious causes in America. The Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions was an organization that sought to recruit college and university students in the United States for missionary service abroad. It also publicized and encouraged the missionary enterprise in general.
Collection
Theological Discussion Group
The majority of the approximately 200 papers were written in connection with the Theological Discussion Group. The papers provide insight into the thoughts and Christian perspective of numerous American theologians and discuss various religious issues of the times. Papers arising from other organizations with similar intent are also contained in the collection. The Theological Discussion Group was established in 1934 as a series of two weekend retreat discussions during the academic year where prominent American theologians met to exchange ideas. The meetings were held at Yale Divinity School and in Washington, D.C.
Collection
War Emergency Council on Student Christian Work
The records document the effect of war time emergency measures on student religious work on college and university campuses throughout the United States during the years 1942 to 1944. The War Emergency Council on Student Christian Work was established in 1942 to deal with the readjustments made necessary by the impact of World War II on college and university campuses. The Council collected and disseminated information, arranged regional consultative conferences, and worked as an intermediary between the United States military establishment and student religious movements.