Search

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names Hull, Cordell, 1871-1955 Remove constraint Names: Hull, Cordell, 1871-1955

Search Results

Collection
Stokes, Anson Phelps, 1874-1958
The papers consist of correspondence, writings, subject files, memorabilia, photographs, financial records, and other papers detailing the professional career and personal life of Anson Phelps Stokes and family members, including Olivia, Caroline and Helen Stokes. Papers relating to Anson Phelps Stokes document his work with prominent educators, reformers, religious leaders, businessmen, and politicians. Stokes's work on behalf of black education, social issues, and the Phelps-Stokes Fund are detailed. His religious activities, Yale University work, and family interests are also represented, as are Stokes's work on behalf of the Portsmouth Treaty of 1905 and the Yale-China Association. Papers relating to Helen Phelps Stokes include material relating to the Socialist Party and the National Civil Liberties Bureau.
Collection
Lane, Arthur Bliss, 1894-1956
The papers consist of official, personal, and business correspondence, articles, speeches, clippings, recordings, photographs, and other papers of Arthur Bliss Lane, career diplomat, public servant, and lecturer. The papers reflect Lane's diplomatic career from the time he entered the service in Rome (1916), until his resignation as Ambassador to Poland (1947), and contain correspondence from international political figures. Also included are materials relating to his work on behalf of Poland, anti-communism, and the Republican Party.
Collection
Seymour, Charles, 1885-1963
The papers consist of correspondence with Edward M. House (1920-1938), personal correspondence, manuscripts and correspondence preparatory to the publication of Seymour's Intimate Papers of Colonel House (1926-1928), newspaper clippings, articles, and memorabilia. Much of the material concerns Seymour's role as delegate to the Paris Peace Conference of 1919.
Collection
Acheson, Dean, 1893-1971
The papers include correspondence, writings, speeches, memoranda, and photographs, documenting Dean Acheson's life after leaving the U.S. State Department in 1953. Also documented is his work as a member of the Yale Corporation and his long friendship with Felix Frankfurter, Archibald MacLeish, and others. The correspondence and memoranda contain Acheson's views on many contemporary issues in American foreign policy such as Korea, the Middle East, NATO, Germany, the war in Vietnam, and Rhodesia and South Africa. The papers also include Acheson's later reflections on his years in public life and assessments of the U.S. government under the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations. Acheson's numerous correspondents include personal friends, American and foreign government officials, journalists, and a wide range of other persons in public life. The papers also include manuscripts, notes, and reviews for several of Acheson's books.
Collection
Borchard, Edwin, 1884-1951
The papers consist of correspondence, research notes, memoranda, writings, speeches, newspaper clippings, and memorabilia of Edwin Borchard, professor of law at Yale University, specialist in international law, adviser to government and business, and controversial advocate of American neutrality in both world wars. The correspondence reflects both his political and legal interests. Most important among his correspondents is John Bassett Moore, with whom he exchanged over 2,000 letters between 1917 and 1947. Other political figures and organizations include the America First Committee, the American Civil Liberties Union, Charles Beard, William E. Borah, John H. Danaher, Hiram Johnson, James A. Shanley, and George Holden Tinkham. Extensive subject files in the papers relate to Borchard's work as a member of various international commissions as well as in United States law and politics. The files contain research notes, memoranda, minutes of meetings, and related correspondence. The section on his writings, which are preserved in both typescript draft and printed form, includes books, articles, speeches, pamphlets, book reviews, and a draft for an unpublished book on enemy property. Only a small part of the papers relate to Borchard's work as a professor of law at Yale University and there is no family correspondence.
Collection
Stimson, Henry L. (Henry Lewis), 1867-1950
The papers consist of correspondence, letter books, speeches, articles, letters to the editor, statements prepared for presentation to Congress and substantial subject files with clippings, printed matter, reports, memoranda and photographs related to Henry Stimson's various public offices. While the official records of Stimson's service (as Secretary of War under President Taft, Secretary of State under Herbert Hoover and as Secretary of War in the cabinets of Presidents Roosevelt and Truman) are all in the National Archives, the substantial correspondence, as well as other papers, in this collection provide important records of his activities as a private citizen and in office and on special missions. His work in Latin America in helping to settle a dispute between Chile and Peru in 1926, and as the United States representative seeking to bring an end to a civil war in Nicaragua in 1927 is shown in the papers with first-hand reports and background material.His service as Secretary of State under Hoover (1929-1933) is particularly well documented with memoranda of conversations with foreign diplomatic representatives, and briefing books presenting background information on foreign affairs for the period. Of major importance are Stimson's diaries which span the years 1904-1945, covering the entire period of his public career and including references to the early stages of the development of the atom bomb.Extensive family papers include the correspondence (1846-1966) of Stimson's parents, sister, and other relatives. In his father's papers are a series of diaries (1864-1916). There is also a collection of letters by Stimson to his wife and to other family members.
Collection
Rogers, James Harvey, 1886-1939
The papers include correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, newspaper clippings, and teaching materials which document the career of James Harvey Rogers. The correspondence documents Rogers's academic appointments, research, participation in formulating economic policies for the New Deal, his post as American representative to the Economic Committee of the League of Nations, and his trip to China, Japan, and India in 1934 as a representative of the U.S. Treasury to study the silver situation. Rogers's academic life is represented by extensive notes taken during his graduate studies at Yale University (1912-1916), correspondence with members of the Economics Department (1930-1939), examinations, student papers, and material relating to Pierson College, of which he was a fellow. Rogers's research material includes offprints, clippings, press releases, and other materials on international trade, war debts, foreign investments, European economic problems, monetary reform, and the Depression. Personal papers include a small quantity of family correspondence and diaries of trips to Europe.
Collection
Tilson, John Q. (John Quillin), 1866-1958
Correspondence, speeches, travel diaries, and documents relating to John Q. Tilson's public life. The diary of his trip to Europe in 1925 was kept while studying munitions for a report to Calvin Coolidge. Another diary reports on a trip to the Orient in 1927. Correspondence reflects his service in the Connecticut National Guard and his connection with Yale Law School. He lectured there on parliamentary law from 1930 until his death, and papers from this course are also in the collection. Of particular interest in the correspondence is a letter from Calvin Coolidge (1923) and another from Cordell Hull (1940).
Collection
Mott, John R. (John Raleigh), 1865-1955
The papers document the multitude of activities and involvements pursued by John R. Mott in over seventy years of working life. General correspondence, 1886-1955, comprises nearly half the bulk of Mott's papers, and includes letters to and from prominent American governmental leaders, philanthropists, international political, social, and religious leaders. Family papers and correspondence provide valuable biographical and genealogical information as well as revealing another dimension of Mott's life, his role as a devoted son, brother, husband, and father. John R. Mott was born on May 25, 1865 in Sullivan County, New York. His higher education was pursued at Upper Iowa University, Fayette, Iowa (1881-1885) and at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (Ph.B., 1888: Phi Beta Kappa). He received honorary degrees from Yale, Edinburgh, Princeton, Brown, Toronto, and other universities. He served as administrator and leader of various organizations including the Young Men's Christian Association, Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions, World Student Christian Federation, Foreign Missions Conference of North America, International Missionary Council, Interchurch World Movement, Institute of Social and Religious Research, and the World Council of Churches. In 1916, Mott was a member of the commission assigned to negotiate a settlement with Mexico. In 1917, he participated in a special diplomatic mission to Russia headed by Senator Elihu Root. Mott was co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946. During his career, he was officially honored by the governments of the United States, France, Italy, Japan, Poland, Greece, Jerusalem, Siam, Sweden, China, Czechoslovakia, Norway, Hungary, Estonia, Portugal, and Finland. Mott died in Orlando, Florida on January 31, 1955.