Search

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names Dulles, John Foster, 1888-1959 Remove constraint Names: Dulles, John Foster, 1888-1959

Search Results

Collection
Lindbergh, Anne Morrow, 1906-2001
The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, writings, childhood, school and college materials, housekeeping and social records, reports, memoranda and correspondence from the many organizations in which Anne Morrow Lindbergh took an active interest. Also included are voluminous mail from members of her reading public and memorabilia, both objects sent by admirers and items collected by her on her travels. The death of Charles Lindbergh in 1974 is documented by mail from friends, members of the public and organizations. Anne Morrow Lindbergh's writings make up the largest part of the papers and include her diaries (1929-1972, 1982-1988), drafts of her books, working notebooks, speeches, articles and stories, and published reviews of her work. Also in the papers are printed copies of her publications. Her personal correspondence with friends and family runs over many years. Correspondence with friends includes letters exchanged with Anne Carrel, Harry Guggenheim, Corliss Lamont, Harold and Nigel Nicolson, Vita Sackville-West, Igor Sikorsky, Truman and Katherine Smith, Helen and Kurt Wolff, Jean Stafford and Mary Ellen Chase. Her family correspondence contains letters exchanged by Anne Morrow Lindbergh and members of her immediate family as well as members of the Morrow, Lindbergh and Cutter families.
Collection
Stokes, Anson Phelps, 1874-1958
The papers consist of correspondence, writings, subject files, memorabilia, photographs, financial records, and other papers detailing the professional career and personal life of Anson Phelps Stokes and family members, including Olivia, Caroline and Helen Stokes. Papers relating to Anson Phelps Stokes document his work with prominent educators, reformers, religious leaders, businessmen, and politicians. Stokes's work on behalf of black education, social issues, and the Phelps-Stokes Fund are detailed. His religious activities, Yale University work, and family interests are also represented, as are Stokes's work on behalf of the Portsmouth Treaty of 1905 and the Yale-China Association. Papers relating to Helen Phelps Stokes include material relating to the Socialist Party and the National Civil Liberties Bureau.
Collection
Lane, Arthur Bliss, 1894-1956
The papers consist of official, personal, and business correspondence, articles, speeches, clippings, recordings, photographs, and other papers of Arthur Bliss Lane, career diplomat, public servant, and lecturer. The papers reflect Lane's diplomatic career from the time he entered the service in Rome (1916), until his resignation as Ambassador to Poland (1947), and contain correspondence from international political figures. Also included are materials relating to his work on behalf of Poland, anti-communism, and the Republican Party.
Collection
Erickson, C. Telford (Charles Telford), 1867-1966
The collection consists of correspondence, writings, and printed material dating from 1908 to 1973, relating to Erickson's personal life and a number of aspects of Albanian history during this period. Letters document the Ericksons' journey to and life in Albania, and interactions with statesmen, presidents, senators and others regarding Albania's political situation. Charles Telford Erickson was born in Galesburg, Illinois in 1867. He served as a Congregational minister before and after his missionary service in Albania, which began in 1908. Erickson served for 12 years under the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions and 14 years independently. From 1920 to 1921, he was Special Commissioner for Albania to the U.S. and from 1922 to 1923, he assisted American Legation staff in Albania. Following retirement, Erickson traveled widely, promoting the World Council of Churches and the International Missionary Council, and as a spokesman for Albania.
Collection
Acheson, Dean, 1893-1971
The papers include correspondence, writings, speeches, memoranda, and photographs, documenting Dean Acheson's life after leaving the U.S. State Department in 1953. Also documented is his work as a member of the Yale Corporation and his long friendship with Felix Frankfurter, Archibald MacLeish, and others. The correspondence and memoranda contain Acheson's views on many contemporary issues in American foreign policy such as Korea, the Middle East, NATO, Germany, the war in Vietnam, and Rhodesia and South Africa. The papers also include Acheson's later reflections on his years in public life and assessments of the U.S. government under the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations. Acheson's numerous correspondents include personal friends, American and foreign government officials, journalists, and a wide range of other persons in public life. The papers also include manuscripts, notes, and reviews for several of Acheson's books.
Collection
Borchard, Edwin, 1884-1951
The papers consist of correspondence, research notes, memoranda, writings, speeches, newspaper clippings, and memorabilia of Edwin Borchard, professor of law at Yale University, specialist in international law, adviser to government and business, and controversial advocate of American neutrality in both world wars. The correspondence reflects both his political and legal interests. Most important among his correspondents is John Bassett Moore, with whom he exchanged over 2,000 letters between 1917 and 1947. Other political figures and organizations include the America First Committee, the American Civil Liberties Union, Charles Beard, William E. Borah, John H. Danaher, Hiram Johnson, James A. Shanley, and George Holden Tinkham. Extensive subject files in the papers relate to Borchard's work as a member of various international commissions as well as in United States law and politics. The files contain research notes, memoranda, minutes of meetings, and related correspondence. The section on his writings, which are preserved in both typescript draft and printed form, includes books, articles, speeches, pamphlets, book reviews, and a draft for an unpublished book on enemy property. Only a small part of the papers relate to Borchard's work as a professor of law at Yale University and there is no family correspondence.
Collection
Polk, Frank L. (Frank Lyon), 1871-1943
The papers consist of correpondence, letterbooks, documents, diaries, subject files and other materials documenting the personal life and professional career of Frank Lyon Polk. The bulk of the material relates to Polk's Department of State service and includes correspondence with political figures, letterpress copybooks (1915-1917), and diaries (1915-1920). Materials relating to the American Commission to Negotiate Peace and the League of Nations are also included.
Collection
Baldwin, Hanson Weightman, 1903-1991
The papers consist of correspondence, writings, subject files, research materials, publicity for books, and other papers of Hanson W. Baldwin, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and military affairs reporter and editor for the New York Times from 1929-1968, and editor for Reader's Digest, 1968-1976. The papers relate to Baldwin's work and interests as a journalist and author and include correspondence with many high-ranking officers of the armed services, government officials, and writers and historians, as well as other members of the staff of the New York Times and Reader's Digest. Of particular interest are the subject files of printed materials and clippings which Baldwin collected and maintained for his own use. Included in these files are a number of important reports, transcriptions, and other items, some of which are not easily obtainable elsewhere.
Collection
Frank, Jerome, 1889-1957
The papers consist of correspondence, legal material (including opinions, decisions, calendars, memoranda, and other papers), writings, speeches, Yale course materials, and family and personal papers of Jerome N. Frank, lawyer, government official during the New Deal, author, legal philosopher, teacher, and federal judge. The papers reflect Frank's wide range of activities, interests, and associations, and include important correspondence with many well known government officials, lawyers, philosophers, educators, authors, and judges. The papers and correspondence reflecting Frank's interest in and advocacy of "legal realism," the papers dealing with the politics and programs of the New Deal, and the papers relating to "Learned Hand's Court," the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals are arranged in this collection.
Collection
Mott, John R. (John Raleigh), 1865-1955
The papers document the multitude of activities and involvements pursued by John R. Mott in over seventy years of working life. General correspondence, 1886-1955, comprises nearly half the bulk of Mott's papers, and includes letters to and from prominent American governmental leaders, philanthropists, international political, social, and religious leaders. Family papers and correspondence provide valuable biographical and genealogical information as well as revealing another dimension of Mott's life, his role as a devoted son, brother, husband, and father. John R. Mott was born on May 25, 1865 in Sullivan County, New York. His higher education was pursued at Upper Iowa University, Fayette, Iowa (1881-1885) and at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (Ph.B., 1888: Phi Beta Kappa). He received honorary degrees from Yale, Edinburgh, Princeton, Brown, Toronto, and other universities. He served as administrator and leader of various organizations including the Young Men's Christian Association, Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions, World Student Christian Federation, Foreign Missions Conference of North America, International Missionary Council, Interchurch World Movement, Institute of Social and Religious Research, and the World Council of Churches. In 1916, Mott was a member of the commission assigned to negotiate a settlement with Mexico. In 1917, he participated in a special diplomatic mission to Russia headed by Senator Elihu Root. Mott was co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946. During his career, he was officially honored by the governments of the United States, France, Italy, Japan, Poland, Greece, Jerusalem, Siam, Sweden, China, Czechoslovakia, Norway, Hungary, Estonia, Portugal, and Finland. Mott died in Orlando, Florida on January 31, 1955.