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Collection
Walling, Anna Strunsky, 1879-
The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, writings, memorabilia and photographs. The correspondence (1897-1964) which includes family, friends and political associates documents Walling's involvement in political causes. The letters also reveal Anna Walling's feelings on personal matters, social questions and her reactions to meetings with prominent persons both in the United States and abroad. Her trip to Russia (ca. 1905-1907) with William English Walling where they toured the provinces and met many literary and political figures is described in her letters home. Important personal correspondents are Melville Anderson, Gelette Burgess, Harry Cowell, Hutchins Hapgood, Ray Nash, Charles Edward Russell, Katherine Maryson, Jane Roulson, James Graham Phelps Stokes, Rose Pastor Stokes, Upton Sinclair and Gaylord Wilshire. There are also a number of letters from prominent political and literary figures of the period, among them Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Zona Gale, Arnold Genthe, Jesse Jackson, Vida Scudder, Irving Stone, Henrietta Szold, Norman Thomas and Rabindranath Tagore. Despite her prolonged love affair with Jack London only a few copies of his letters are in the correspondence, (She gave many of his letters, manuscripts, etc. to the Huntington Library.)
Collection
Baldwin family
The papers detail the personal lives and professional careers of several generations and family lines of the Baldwin family. The legal, political, and business activities of family members in Connecticut, New York, and elsewhere are documented. Major topics include: family, women, law, education, Connecticut and New York politics and government, New Haven, Connecticut, and Yale University.
Collection
Bunnell family
The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, legal and financial records, writings, memorabilia, and pictorial material which document the activities of four generations of Bunnell and Sterling family members living primarily in Connecticut and New York. Correspondence, diaries, writings, and memorabilia document the Yale academic careers of Sterling Haight and Frank Scott Bunnell and John W. Sterling, the Civil War service of Rufus W. Bunnell and Henry T. Plant, and the travels of family members to destinations including the Southern and Western United States, Europe, and Hawaii. Correspondence, legal and financial records, diaries, and pictorial material document the respective architectural, engineering, and teaching careers of Rufus W., Sterling Haight, and Frank Scott Bunnell. The activities of female members of the Bunnell and Sterling families as mothers, wives, and daughters are documented by material thoughout the papers.
Collection

Day family papers, 1767-1929 25.83 Linear Feet

Day family
The Day family papers consist of correspondence, account books, diaries, journals, lectures, manuscripts, notes, sermons, and related papers of the Day family, 1767-1929. The personal lives, academic activities, and professional careers of several family members are documented, including Reverend Jeremiah Day (1737-1806), Reverend Jeremiah Day (1773-1867), Henry Noble Day (1808-1890), Mills Day (1783-1812), and others.
Collection
Smith, Harrison
The Harrison Smith Papers contain writings, correspondence, printed material, and photographs that document the life and work of editor and publisher Harrison Smith, particularly his research on American author Sinclair Lewis, and his editorial work for the Saturday Review of Literature. Series I, Research Files on Sinclair Lewis, includes extensive biographical notes, presumably intended as the source material for a book-length biography of Lewis. Series II, Other Papers, consists chiefly of writings, interviews, and speeches that relate to the position of women in early- and mid-twentieth century society.
Collection
Johnstone family
Chiefly diaries and correspondence by the wife and daughters of Thomas Pinckney Johnstone, a missionary to Turkey from 1833 to 1853. The diaries record their attempts to convert Turkish, Greek, and Armenian neighbors, the persecutions suffered by the converts, and the life of the missionary family. Diaries and letters written on their return to the United States describe their life in Granville, Ohio where they met anti-slavery activists; in Salem, Massachusetts; and in New Haven, Connecticut. The diary of Martha Johnstone Walker reports on her experiences at the Le Roy Seminary in New York. Also in the papers are six family letters and genealogies of the Walker and Johnstone families.
Collection
Havemeyer, Loomis, 1886-1971
The papers consist of correspondence, writings, personal papers, diaries and journals, photographs, and scrapbooks relating to the life and career of Loomis Havemeyer. The collection documents Havemeyer's childhood, his experiences at Hill School, undergraduate and graduate studies at Yale University, as well as his lengthy career as an instructor and an administrator at the university. Details regarding Havemeyer's personal life are recorded primarily in his diaries and in his autobiographical writings. An audiotape of his memorial service is included. The papers also include travel diaries of Loomis Havemeyer's sister, Julia Loomis Havemeyer, which record in detail her summer travels abroad.
Collection
Bingham, Millicent Todd, 1880-1968
One-fifth of the papers are devoted to correspondence, books, articles, speeches and research notes relating to her publication of Emily Dickinson's poems in Bolts of Melody (1945) and three subsequent books about Emily Dickinson. Bingham's education as well as her professional life as a teacher of French and as a geographer, particularly of Peru, are thoroughly documented with correspondence, research notes, publications and other papers (1885-1929).
Collection
Seymour family
This collection is made up of the papers of ten individual members and six branches of the Seymour family: the Day family, Parsons-Dean families, Watkins-Law families, Leggett-Seymour-Doolittle families, St. John family, and Howard family. The largest sections are those of Thomas Day Seymour, Charles Seymour (1885-1963), and Charles Seymour, Jr. The collection represents six generations of an intellectually and socially prominent family and through correspondence and diaries offers detailed evidence on social life and customs in New Haven, Hartford and nineteenth-century Ohio.
Collection
Woolsey family
The papers document three generations of the Woolsey family. The most prominent figures in the collection are William Walton Woolsey (1766-1839), land owner and merchant in New York City; his son, Theodore Dwight Woolsey (1801-1889), Greek scholar, political theorist and president of Yale College; and Theodore Salisbury Woolsey (1852-1929), professor of international law at Yale Law School, son of Theodore Dwight Woolsey. The papers of William Walton Woolsey contain extensive business correspondence, ledgers, legal papers, documents relating to land sales in New York and Ohio, as well as family and personal letters. Since he was engaged in the importation of sugar, cotton and hardware, some of his business correspondence is political with discussions of the Jay Treaty of 1794, the problems of piracy, American neutrality in the 1790s and the general politics of the period. Important correspondents are Chauncey Goodrich, Archibald Gracie, Eli Whitney, Noah Webster, Elihu and Nathaniel Chauncey, Oliver Wolcott, Benjamin Tallmadge, Jedidiah Morse, James Roosevelt, John A. Schuyler, Comfort Sands, John Broome, and Nicholas Bayard. The papers of Theodore Dwight Woolsey contain his writings on Greek language and literature, the Bible, international law and the texts of his sermons.