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Collection
Stokes, Anson Phelps, 1874-1958
The papers consist of correspondence, writings, subject files, memorabilia, photographs, financial records, and other papers detailing the professional career and personal life of Anson Phelps Stokes and family members, including Olivia, Caroline and Helen Stokes. Papers relating to Anson Phelps Stokes document his work with prominent educators, reformers, religious leaders, businessmen, and politicians. Stokes's work on behalf of black education, social issues, and the Phelps-Stokes Fund are detailed. His religious activities, Yale University work, and family interests are also represented, as are Stokes's work on behalf of the Portsmouth Treaty of 1905 and the Yale-China Association. Papers relating to Helen Phelps Stokes include material relating to the Socialist Party and the National Civil Liberties Bureau.
Collection
Bronson family
Correspondence, legal and financial papers, a diary and miscellaneous items of the Bronson family of Washington, Connecticut. The largest part of the papers are those of Moseley Virgil Bronson (1806-1890), documenting his career as an officer of the Connecticut militia and as a teacher in New York and Connecticut. Of particular interest are the letters of Edna Moseley Todd, who moved to Virginia in 1821, and whose letters to various members of the family describe her life as a mother and school teacher, as well as offering comments on slavery and abolitionism. Also in the papers is the diary of Maria N. Fowler Ford, recording her experience as a physician's wife in Hawaii (1854-1858) and in New York and Connecticut (1858-1861). There are also miscellaneous papers of the Hollister family.
Collection
Smith, Edward Parmelee, 1827-1876
The papers consist of miscellaneous personal papers of Edward Parmelee Smith including letters to his future wife (1851-1854) and letters to his daughter (1872-1873) with an account of a sea voyage to California and his impressions once there. His years at Yale College are documented by an autograph album with messages from his teachers and classmates (1849-1855). Among the four photographs in the papers is one showing Smith with six students when he was president of Howard University, Washington, D.C. (1875). Clippings and correspondence describe his work as Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1873) and his death in Africa in 1876 while an envoy of the American Missionary Association.