Collection ID: MS 1858

Collection context

Summary

Creator:
Gaines, William L.
Date:
1937-2004
Abstract:
The papers of William Louis Gaines contain correspondence, topical files, and journals. Journals comprise the great majority of the collection and cover almost his entire life. The journals, often over six hundred pages per year, provide comprehensive details about the organizations where Gaines was employed, analysis of current events, personal information, and much introspection.
Extent:
9.5 Linear Feet
Language:
English

Background

Acquisition information:
Gift of the Estate of William Louis Gaines, 2005.
Rules or conventions:
translation missing: en.enumerations.resource_finding_aid_description_rules.Finding aid created in accordance with Manuscripts and Archives Processing Manual
Scope and Content:

The papers of William Louis Gaines contain correspondence, topical files, and journals. Journals comprise the great majority of the collection and cover almost his entire life. The journals, often over six hundred pages per year, provide comprehensive details about the organizations where Gaines was employed, analysis of current events, personal information, and much introspection.

Biographical / Historical:

Born in Monticello, Indiana, William Louis Gaines attended Bowling Green State University (B.A., 1946) and the University of Nebraska, Lincoln (M.A., 1947). In 1951, he completed his doctoral dissertation in history at Yale University. For five years following, Gaines worked as an assistant political attache at the United States Embassy in London. In 1956, Gaines entered the field that he would become most associated with, international education. He served as executive secretary at the U.S.-U.K. Education Commission until 1961, when he became associate director of Commonwealth Fellowships. In these positions, Gaines administered scholarship programs that encouraged international exchange. From 1962 to 1970, Gaines was director of education at the African-American Institute, where he worked with both African and American universities. For the subsequent four years, he was a professor of history at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, concurrently serving first as dean of academic affairs, then as dean of international studies. From 1974 until his retirement in 1992, Gaines was President of the Institute of European Studies and the Institute of Asian Studies. Throughout his life, Gaines promoted intellectual achievement through international exchange. He died in February 2005.

Arrangement:

The papers are arranged by type of material.

Access

LOCATION OF THIS COLLECTION:
Sterling Memorial Library
Yale Campus
New Haven, CT, USA
CONTACT:
(203) 432-1735
mssa.assist@yale.edu