Collection ID: M.98

Collection context

Summary

Creator:
Chase Collegiate School (1865-2020) (Waterbury, CT)
Date:
1863-2020
Abstract:
The Records of the Chase Collegiate School span from 1863-2020. Founded as an all girls school in 1865, the Collegiate Institute for Young Ladies taught a complete education for women in Waterbury, CT. Reorganized in 1875 as Saint Margaret's School for Girls, the school continued its mission of educating young women. In 1912 McTernan's School for Boys was founded in Waterbury as an all boys school by Charles McTernan and in 1973 the 2 schools merged to become a non-demoninational co-ed school named Saint Margaret's-McTernan School. In 2005 the school was renamed Chase Collegiate School. In all of its iterations, the school was always focused academic achievements, creative expression, a sense of community, and the development of leadership qualities. The Records of the School are divided into series based on the various names of the school. The collection largely reflects student life, but also includes administrative files. Object types include but not limited to: annual reports, correspondence, handbooks, course descriptions, meeting minutes, photographs, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, student publications, performance ephemera, and event files.
Extent:
75 Linear Feet and 75 manuscript boxes, 2 newspaper boxes, 336 volumes, 4 high density photograph boxes, 6 magazine holders, and 8.115 GB.
Language:
English , French .

Background

Rules or conventions:
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Scope and Content:

The Records of the Chase Collegiate School are divided into five series based on the name of the school as per original order. Included in this structure are the Mcternan School records, as when the 2 schools merged in 1973, the records were transferred to the Saint Margaret's-McTernan archive.

Each series is further divided into subseries: Trustee Files; Heads of School; Administrative Files; Alumni Association; Student Affairs; Scrapbooks; and Photographs. The Collegiate Institute for Young ladies has very few records, so there are no subseries. Mcternan's records were lost during a flood, so there are no subseries but the records reflect the structure of the others. The Administrative Files subseries was divided further into subsubseries. Original order was largely followed.

The collection largely reflects student life, but there is a small amount of administraive files. Object types include but are not limited to annual reports, correspondence, handbooks, course descriptions, meeting minutes, photographs, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, student publications, performance ephemera, and event files. Since the collection spans from 1869-2020, it reflects and responds to local and national events like WWI, WWII, influenza epidemic of 1919, women's right to vote, civil rights, student protests of the 1960s, Sandy Hook, and others.

Biographical / Historical:

The Collegiate Institute for Young Ladies was founded in Waterbury, CT as a school for young women to obtain a "complete education." In 1864, local citizens and prominent businessmen began fundraising to begin a seminary school for women under the organization called the Waterbury School Association. In May of 1865 the local newspaper the Waterbury American, announced that the Association had collected enough money to purchase land, build a school, and begin classes in the fall of 1865. The school was built on the corner of Cooke and Grove Street. On September 13, 1865 the school was dedicated, although it was not entirely complete. Teachers and boarders were housed at the Scovill House until it was complete. During the dedication, F.J. Kingsbury, the head of the board, spoke as well as Rev. Dr. Kerfoot from Trinity College and they emphasized the need for the education of women. Rev R.G. Williams was the first principal and with his wife were at the school for four years. In the fall of 1873, the school was closed for one year due to money issues.

In June of 1875 the school was reopened as Saint Margaret's School for Girls and the school continued its mission of educating young women. Saint Margaret's became a diocesan school and was headed by Reverend Francis T. Russell who had previously been serving as assistant rector of Saint John's church. Under Russell's charge the school became self-supporting and very successful. His tenure lasted from 1875-1891 and during his time an alumni group was founded, a logo was created for the school, a school motto was chosen, and a student newspaper called the Daisy Chain was produced. Mary Hillard was headmisstress of Saint Margaret's from 1891-1909 and ushered in a sense of community. During her tenure students were encouraged to create clubs and participate in other school activities. Edith Mason, a student, wrote the school song, she helped found the yearbook known as the Salmagundi, and she helped to restart the student magazine which was called the Magpie.

In 1912 McTernan's School for Boys was founded in Waterbury as an all boys school by Charles McTernan. The school emphasized self-discipline, close student-teacher relationships, guided independent studies, and sense of community. The school catered to a middle school audience as a prepatory course for boarding schools. Students learned Math, English, Latin and History.

In the 1920s Saint Margaret's School moved from Cooke and Grove Street to it's home on Chase Parkway and the current home of ACES at Chase. Between 1920 and 1970, campus was expanded to include a library, a lower and upper school building, and sports facilities.

In 1973 Saint Margaret's and McTernan's merged to become a non-demoninational co-ed school named Saint Margaret's-McTernan School. In 2005 the school was renamed Chase Collegiate School. The school closed in August 2020.

In all of its iterations, the school was always focused academic achievements, creative expression, a sense of community, and the development of leadership qualities.

Processing information:

The Mattatuck Museum acknowledges that this specific collection include photographs reflecting various forms of oppression, including but not limited to offensive and outdated language or negative stereotypes. In order to uphold the principles of free access to our collections, these materials are presented in their original and unaltered forms for research and study to address and confront the racist realities of American history and inform our present moment. By providing online and physical access to these historical documents and objects, the Mattatuck Museum does not endorse any attitudes, prejudices, or behaviors depicted in them. Please let us know if you find materials that may be missing a content warning or if you have suggestions for how we can improve.

Arrangement:

The Records of the Chase Collegiate School are divided into five series based on the name of the school as per original order. Included in this structure are the Mcternan School records, as when the 2 schools merged in 1973, the records were transferred to the Saint Margaret's-McTernan archive.

Each series is further divided into subseries: Trustee Files; Heads of School; Administrative Files; Alumni Association; Student Affairs; Scrapbooks; and Photographs. The Collegiate Institute for Young ladies has very few records, so there are no subseries. Mcternan's records were lost during a flood, so there are no subseries but the records reflect the structure of the others. The Administrative Files subseries was divided further into subsubseries. Original order was largely followed.

A shortcut for foldering was used SMS=Saint Margaret's School; McT= McTernan's; SMT=Saint Margaret's-McTernan's; and Chase=Chase Collegiate.

Indexed Terms

Subjects:
Education
Places:
Waterbury, Connecticut

Access

LOCATION OF THIS COLLECTION:
63 Prospect St
Waterbury, CT, USA
CONTACT:
(203) 753-0381
scrawford@mattmuseum.org