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RG8.1_A_1918.pdf

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State Board of Education
1918

Southington

MARCUS H HOLCOMB Governor
CLIFFORD B WILSON Lieut-Governor

Bridgeport

CHARLES F SMITH

New Britain

HOWELL CHENEY

South Manchester

Eo,vARD D RoBBINS

New Haven

DR JOHN G STANTON

New London

SCHUYLER MERRITT

Stamford

- - - -OFFICES
Room 42 Capitol Hartford Conn
CHARLES D HINE Secretary

Hartford

HENRY C MORRISON Assistant Secretary

Middletown

6

CALENDAR
1918-1919

. 28
2
20
30

1918
September
November
December
D ecember
Dr.cember

Wednesday
Thursday
Monday
Friday
Monday

School year begins
Recess begins
Recess ends
'First term ends
Second term begins

12
28
31
17
21
30
20
7
15
3

19119
January
February
March
March
April
April
May
June
July
August
September

Wednesday
Wednesday
Friday
Monday
Thursday
Monday
Friday
Friday
Monday
Friday
Wedne sday

New Year's Day
Lincoln's Birthday
Second term ends
Third term begins
Easter recess begins
Easter recess ends
-Memorial Day
Third term closes
Summer term beg in s
Summer term closes
Fall term begins

4

7

TEACHERS
NORMAL SCHOOL
JOHN R PERKINS

20 Terrace

Principal

LOTHROP D HIGGINS

.

MARTHA L CowAN

.

5 Harmony

Ps:ychology and pedagogy

.

Direct or of traiaing ; school orga ,ii:::ati'on and 111anagL'm ent

AMY W GAINES

Methodology of history, geoyrothJ', civics, w;·it i"g, an'th,;1 etic

HELEN E M DwENGER

190 White
8 Harmony
10 Chapel pl

S ewing and drawing

ELIZABETH HANLY .

.

FREDER1CK H BLODGETT

.

.

STEPHEN C CLEMENT

.

.

}.tf.etl,,odology of reading, spelli ng, composition, grammar

404 Main
White

Agricultu1·e and general scie11ce

.

.

Sociology, scltool sa111·1ation and hygiene, tests a.11d measurements

LEILA E BROUGHTON

Physical education and hygiene, music

ELSIE F BEERS

62 Division
190 White
11 Harmony

Clerk

ELIZABETH GILLms

.

Librarian.; con·cspondcnce department

12 Ninth av

TRAINING SCHOOLS
*HANSINE D WrEDL

13 Delay

Seventh grade

ANNIB D KYLE

.

.

.

Seventh grade; principal Locust Avenue School

Bethel

M LOUISE TRIBSCHMANN

248 White

KATHARINE A MORRIS

190 White

Second grade

First grade

• Died Octo,be r

1918

8

HELEN B HAWLEY

51 ,Maple av

Fifth grade

ALICE ,M MEAD .

63 Jefferson av

ANNA E ScoLLIN

8 Com stock

ANNA B 1MEANEY

89 Town Hill av

Seventh grade
Fourth grade
Th ird gl'ade

IRENE D ALLEN

47 Wa shington av

First grade

MAY A 'SHERWOOD

New Milford

ANNA E KEATING

47 State

MARGARET F LYNCH

19 South

Sixth grade

Second grade
Third grade

Deer Hill

HELEN F DARAGAN
First grade

10 Chapel pl

DOROTHY E DwENGER
Fifth grade

LILLIAN F ANDREWS

22 Montgomery

Thir d grade

MARIE C COLEMAN

71 South

First grade

ANNETA .MONROE

100 North

Sixth grade

BESSIE T MACKENZIE

.

.

33 Farview av

Principal Balm jorth Avenue Sch~ol

MARGUERITE WHEELER

Bethel

K ind,ergar t en

RUTH WILKINS

Sherman

Sherman

MARY V HOULIHAN

190 White

Miry Brook

ELLA ANDERSON

60 Franklin

ISABEL HUBER

25 Wooster

First grade
First gra de

9

INEZ POLLARD .

48 Farview av

MARGARET REED

11 Robinson av

Eighth grade

Second grade

MARIAN BRADLEY

190 White

.

Gen eral substitute

BESSIB

M

Padanaram rd

HATCH

Sixth grade

A ] EAN

190 White

BROWN

Fottrth grndc

WINFIBLD

s PEASE

246 White

Engineer

HOWARD

C

12 Balmforth av

DURGY

Janitor

10

THE SCHOOL
PURPOSE

This school was established by statute of the state for the purpose of "training teachers in the art of instructing and governing
in the public schools of this state."
In carrying out this purpose it is the constant aim of the school
to try to advance the cause of education by maintaining a progressive attitude in its faculty and seeking to cultivate in its
students ideals of faithful service.
So far as the work is based upon public school subjects they
are those of the elementary schools; but the school offers much, in
both professional instruction and training, that makes its diploma
valuable also to high school teachers. In its summer session, one
department offers a six weeks' course specifically for high school
teachers in special subjects.
EQUIPMENT

The normal school building is a thoroughly modern structure
having a capacity of two hundred students. Class rooms are furnished with individual desks for the - members of the school. An
extensive library supplies all text books as well as books of reference
and magazines. There are laboratories for work in physics and
chemistry, and the school is equipped with a projection lantern and
various scientific material. Excellent provision is made also for
work in drawing and sewing. A gymnasium provides opportunity
for instruction in games and folk dancing, as well as basket ball and
other indoor exercise.
The present dormitory offers accommodation for but twenty
students. It is a half minute's walk from the main school building.
A large plot of land adjoining the normal school grounds has been
bought by the state for a dormitory site.
11

TRAINING SCHOOLS

Twenty-seven public school rooms are under normal school
management for use as training schools for students. These include the whole fourteen-room building of Balmforth Avenue
school and the eight-room building of Locust Avenue school; also
the primary room at vVhite Street school and one primary room at
New Street school. Two rural schools, one at Miry Brook and one
at Sherman Center, offer opportunity for training under actual
country school conditions. A kindergarten is maintained in one
room of the normal school building.
Excepting the kindergarten and the rural school in Sherman,
all of these are regular public schools in the town of Danbury. By
contract with the state the town furnishes the buildings, heat, and
janitor service, and contri·b utes to the cost of supplies for children
at an annual rate of fifty cents per pupil. The state, through the
normal school officers, assumes the entire management of the
schools, pays for books and supplies to pupils in excess of the sum
stated above, and agrees to maintain a standard of schools as high
as of those un de r town manag~ment. Teachers are engaged by
the normal school officers, and receive from the town a salary equal
to the average that it pays in that grade. The state pays each
teacher an additional sum.
The work of these schools is under the immediate supervision
of a director of training, who is also the instructor in school management at the normal school. Each room in the training schools
is regularly in charge of one teacher, who also serves as instructor
in teaching and management to the one or two students temporarily
assigned to her room.
LOCATION

Danbury is on the western border of Connecticut. Being an
industrial city of twenty thousand, and the center of an extensive
12

THE CUR1RICULUM

Candidates for graduation must successfully complete the
equivalent of two years' work of thirty-six weeks each. This may
be done wholly during the usual "school years" from September to
June, or in part at the summer sessions as set forth on page 3 I.
NATURE OF THE WORK

The work includes courses of instruction in education and
school management, in the methods of teaching the usual elementary
school subjects, and in the content of a few school subjects in which
students generally are not well grounded. Members of both senior
and junior classes also receive training in the art of teaching and
managing a school.
The maturity of the students and the serious purpose of the
school call for standards of requirement equal to those of the first
two years of college. Such work as is done in common school
subjects is technical instruction in the philosophy and methods of
teaching them. With very little exception the content of these
elementary subjects is not taught, and students are assumed either
to know it or to be able to post themselves without help.
SYLLABUS

The following syllabus, adopted by the state board of education is the basis on which the work of the school is planned.
(1)

(2)

P sychology and P edagogy

General educational psychology
(a) Elementary survey of normal mental processes
(b) The Educative Process
Psychology of special subjects
(a) Reading
(b) Writing
(c) Arithmetic
(d) Spelling: Mainly a study of visual, auditory, motor,
and vocal imagery
14

(3)

Psychology of mental defectives
Speech defects
Hearing and vision tests

Intended only to make teachers intelligent about the nature of common
mental and sensory defects as found in the schoolroom. Not intended as
training for institutional treatment.
School Sanitation and Hygiene

1 The characteristics of a sanitary building or schoolroom: location,
light, heat and ventilation, furniture, wardrobes, closets, entries, urinals,as applied to different types of buildings.
2 The health of the school child. By this is not meant methodolgy
in hygiene teaching, but rather the teacher's duties to the children from the
health standpoint, such as care of school children's teeth, getting them
clean, control of head and scalp, posture, signs of common infectious diseases, attitude toward poorly nourished and anaemic children.
3 Technique of teacher's duties in medical inspection.
Routine of inspection, examinations, forms, notifications, follow-up:
duties of school physician, of school nurse, teacher's relation to each.
Physical Ed1tcation
(1)

Physical care of students, and gymnasium

This will involve the employment of a competently trained
physical director who should be instructed with the formulation of a course
and procedure.
(2)

Principles of physical education and methodology with children

This will involve the formulation of a course broad enough to
meet all conditions in the state, and this formulation will have to be deferred until a director is found. A director for inspectorial and prom.o tional
purposes may later be attached to the 'State office.
15

School Organization and Management

General schoolroom management
Organization of room, keeping the register ( each girl should
keep a register), principles underlying time-table construction, care of
books, supplies, control of recess period, control of noon-hour.
( 1)

(2)

Discipline
Attitude of teache r to pupils; real meaning of behavior of pupils
at different ages: theory of punishments and penalties
The recitation
Legitimate use of recitation, organization of material of different
courses for study purposes, the deferred and written reci tations, "Batavia"
work
Technique of supervised study.
(3)

(4)

Tests and measurements
Purpose and use of measurements, limitations, practice in manipulation of all existing tests and recording and interpreting results. Pedagogical diagnosis. Simple fr equency surfaces and use in disclosing to
teacher pedagogical situations.
Sociology
( 1)

society.

Social institutions and the place and function of each in modern

(2) Social pathology as applied to juveniles,-dependent, defective and
delinquent children. Common causes lying behind dependency, deficiency,
and delinquency in chi ldren. What the teacher can do in managing cases.
Conn. 1Laws and institutions for dealing with the problem.
(3)

from.

Racial elements in the public schools and problems arising there -

Chief racial components of Connecticut population. History
lying behind each immigration. Characteristics of each racial group. Peculiar problems which each group has to meet.
16

Methodology

Reading, writing, spelling, composition, grammar.
Arithmetic, hygiene, physical education.
Physiology
Geography, history, civics.
Nature study and elementary science.
Music.
Drawing.
Practice teaching:

18 weeks.
Academic

Academic instruction to be limited to those subjects in which there is
at present no regular high school preparation. These will include:
Nature study and elementary science for those students who have not
had them in high school: 36 weeks.
Music:

36 weeks.

Drawing:

36 weeks.

17



PLAN OF WORK

Junior Year

/

half day
3 periods

Observation and teaching
" Education
Elementary science
., Reading
Spelling
Arithmetic
Language
Literature and grammar
History
Geography
Music
Physical education
Drawing
Hygiene
Penmanship
Sewing

3_

2

2
2
2

3
3
3
2

2

2'

1 period
1

12 weeks
30
30
15
15
15
15
30
15
15
30
30
30
30
30
30

Senior Year

whole day
3 periods

Observation and teaching
Education
School management .
Sociology
Nature study and agriculture
Physical education and games
Music
Drawing
Sewing
School law and civics
School sanitation
Directed reading
Public speaking

2
2
3
2

2
2
2

period

12 weeks
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24

TRAINING

Training m teaching and managing children under actual
schoolroom conditions forms a very important part of the normal
18

school course. Each student spends an aggregate of one-half year's
full time in the training schools. This course is divided into five
periods of one full month each. Three of these periods are scattered through the senior year, and the other two are divided among
four months of half days in the junior year, as shown in the following schedule:
Training School Schedule

SEPT .
Junior A
Junior B

OcT.
Senior A
Senior A

Nov.
Senior B
Senior B

DEC.
Junior B
Junior A

JAN.
Senior A
Senior A

A.M.
P.M.

FEB.
Senior B
Senior B

MAR.
Junior A
Junior B

APR.
Senior A
Senior A

MAY
Senior B
Senior B

JUNE
Junior B
Junior A

A.M.
P.M.

This schedule will be in operation after this year. Owing to
changes in the general curriculum some irregularities now prevail.
Division A of the senior class includes the first half of the class
alphabetically. Of the junior class, division A at present includes
those in residence here and B those who commute; so far as practicable the class will be divided on this basis.
The work of each training period is planned to focus the
student's attention upon one phase of teaching or management. In
the first period the student gives particular attention to the physical
surroundings, the welfare of pupils, and a study of the pupils' individual needs; in the second period emphasis is on the lesson
planning, with preparation of illustrative materials for use in teaching, arrangement of blackboard work, etc.; in the third, planning
for work of the pupils during study hours and checking accomplishment, learning the place and value of individual instruction in
methods of study, and a study of recreation periods; fourth, construction of a daily plan sheet showing the ground to be covered in
19

each subject, with due reference to the needs of the class and in
accordance with requirements outlined in the course of study; fifth,
preparation of each days' work as if the entire responsibility for
the room were the student's.
Each student spends a portion of every day in observing classes
taught by the teacher in charge of the room. A report of one or
more of these classes is submitted to the teacher at the close of the
day. This report states the purpose of the lesson and the steps
taken in accomplishing the purpose, together with notes on special
features which the student may have been asked to look for-such
as method of gaining attention, activities of pupils, etc.
The amount of teaching done by the students is gradually increased as they gain experience. In the first training period their
average teaching is twenty minutes daily; in the second forty minutes; in the third period fifty minutes plus one continuous quarter
of a day toward the encl; in the fourth, one hour plus one full half
day; and in the final period, after the first week the student must be
ready to take entire charge of the room at any moment and continue it indefinitely.
The teaching of the first trammg period is wholly of small
groups. In the second period the student teaches first one and later
two classes daily, for which she is required to prepare detailed
plans. For the third, one of the assigned lessons is planned in
detail and the others in the form of outlines. In the fourth period
rather full outlines are made for several lessons, and in the fifth a
teacher's plan sheet is prepared for each day.
In the early part of training the student is made responsible
for the care of physical surroundings in the class room-for ventilation and temperature regulation, care of materials, arrangement of
20

blackboard work, etc. As the amount of teaching is increased,
other duties are accordingly diminished.
Toward the end of each day the student has a brief conference
with her training teacher, in which she receives such notes on her
work through the day as will enable her to improve or strengthen
it in the future. She is also given opportunity to inquire about any
phase of the work which she does not clearly understand.
By arrangement of the training periods at intervals throughout
the two years' normal course it is intended that class-room study
and practical experience shall stimulate and supplement each other
to the advantage of both. Every student is able to gain experience
in at least four representative grades and under different teachers.
Each has two weeks training in one of the rural schools.

21

COURSES OF STUDY
EDUCATION COURSES
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Twelve Weeks

The first course in education is based upon the growth and education of the nervous system. Its purpose is to give definite ideas
of the mechanism of human behavior with reference to its capacities for education.
Each student is expected to acquire ability to use the terms and ·
express the ideas of elementary psychology, and to get clear meanings from the simpler books in the subject.
THE EDUCATIVE PROCESS

Eighteen Weeks

This is a course in the principles of education as applied in
teaching and managing school children. It is based upon the course
in elementary psychology. The purpose is to teach how the pupils'
capacities for education may be utilized and directed, what objectives should guide the teacher's work, and how results may be
measured.
Students are expected to be able to state some educational principles clearly, to show how these are applied in school work, and to
give evidence of increasing ability to get accurate meanings from
educational literature.
PSYCHOLOGY OF ELEMENTARY SUBJECTS

Six Weeks

The purpose of this course is to teach the psychological principles that underlie the methods of teaching elementary subjects,
22

particularly reading, arithmetic, and spelling. The course is given
in the junior year immediately after Education I, as the students
are at that time studying the methodology of these subjects in both
normal and training departments.
EDU CATIONAL SYSTEMS

Nin e W eeks

This course is designed to impart some knowledge of presentday educational systems that are familiar in name, and of those men
and methods of the past that have had some bearing upon public
schools of to-day. Its aim is to stimulate the teachers' profession~!
interest in their work, and especially to lay the foundation for their
own progress in sympathy with that of educational methods.
The students are expected to be able to state the notable
features of each system considered, and also to form and state ideas
of their own regarding their value.
P SYCHOLOGY OF DEFICIBNTS

Six W eeks

Defects of hearing, vision, speech, and mentality are considered. The objects of this work are to instruct teachers in what
sorts of deficiencies to look for, what signs may indicate these, and
what they should do when suspected cases come to their attention.
Methods of determining deficiency are discussed, and ways of dealing with such deficient children as must remain in regular classes
of normal pupils.
EDUCATIONAL READING

Three Weeks

Throughout their courses in education students are expected to
gain familiarity with the names and content of books and other
literature of the subject. Assigned readings are required in a
variety of sources. This brief course at the close of the senior year
23

aims to fix the students' attention upon familiarity with educational
literature as a goal. Results of their previous reading are tested,
and a few typical books are studies and discussed in class.
SCHOOL MANAGEMENT

The aim of this course is to prepare the student to successfully
manage a scnool. This is accomplished first, by observation of and
practice in the management of a particular room in one of the training schools, and second, by a study of the principles underlying
efficient school management.
Among the topics studied are:
the teacher's personality
organization of the school
playground management
hygienic school room conditions
school room decoration
prog ram of work
place and value of routine
keeping of reco rds
technique of class instruction
use of standard tests
order and discipline
co-operation with parents
extra school activities
community interests
professional ethics
METHO DOLOGY

T hirty-six Weeks

The purpose of this course is to organize the subject matter of
history, reading, writing, geography, and arithmetic, and to present
the best methods of teaching these subjects in the primary, intermediate, and grammar grades.
24

In addition to the class work in the normal school, lessons are
given in the model schools demonstrating the methods under discuss10n.
LITERATURE

This course aims to make the prospective teacher familiar with
the literature used in the grades, aware of its particular value, and
adept in its presentation. In connection with the work of the upper
grades the student is expected to acquire a real appreciation not
only of the specific selection but of the author and his place in
literature. The work is taught not for its own sake alone but for
its power to enrich and interpret life. Emphasis, therefore, is laid
upon that which is of permanent worth in form and content.
Incorporated in the literature course are a course in public
speaking and one in directed reading. The public speaking course
aims to develop: adequate oral and written reproduction of material
from outside sources; story-telling technique; and rapid accurate
judgment in choice of new material and adaptation of both new
and old.
The directed reading aims to promote discrimination in the
reading for both relaxation and information and familiarity with
the work of contemporaries whose writings are of weight in the
educational world.
LANGUAGE

In this course stress is laid upon fund amental ideals of language,
-to cultivate a rich, flexible language fund and the ability to draw
upon it at need and will. Material is drawn from other studies,
language games used, force of imitation emphasized, and the dependence of every other study upon language is made conspicuous.
25

SCIENCE COURSES
ELEMENTARY SCIENCE

Twelve Weeks

Some elementary principles of physics are taught as a basis for
science lessons in the higher elementary grades. The course deals
largely with subj ect matter, followed by some study of methods of
presenting science lessons. In general the subjects are chosen with
reference to their bearing upon matters of common usefulness,
from these major topics:
Common forces
Fluids
Heat
Sound
Light
Electricity
CHEMISTRY

Six Weeks

The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the
chemistry of such substances and processes as are common in everyday experience and important for us to !-:now.
The substances discussed are air, water, foods, fuels, clothing
materials, and products of the earth.
The processes discused are oxidation, combustion, explosion,
cleaning processes, fermentations.
NATURE STUDY

Eighteen Weeks

The work of the senior year is a course in nature study, designed to give teachers an interest in and a working knowledge of
natural phenomena in their surroundings. Some attention is also
paid to the need for informing them in certain matters of physical
geography that are not usually understood by our students. The
26

subjects of the course include studies of the heavens; face of the
earth; climate and weather; minerals and natural resources; plants ,
with particular reference to trees; animals-such as flies and miceof which a general knowledge is desirable; and birds.
During this course each student is required to become familiar
with approximately twenty trees, rocks, constellations, and birds.
This they do largely on their own initiative, but tests are held at
stated times.
AGRICULTURE

The work in agriculture is intended to give students a knowledge of some elementary principles of agriculture. The emphasis
is rather upon the care of plants because some of the principles
involved are so universally applicable. The purpose is to prepare
teachers to give children an interest in the work of the farm and
some useful knowledge.
The following topics are included in the coursePlant life
Soil
Care of trees
Insect pests
Plant diseases

SOCIOLOGY

The course is divided into five large topics.
I.
Influences that effect the li fe of society m evolution;
geographic; psycho-physical; social.
2.
Social groups: differentiation of types ; races: characteristics; nationalities in Connecticut population ; institutions;
needs; problems.
3. Social pathology ;-causes, remedies, control; dependent, delinquent, deficient children: 'institutions and management of charities in Connecticut, Indiana, and European systems. Local sociological investigations.
27

4. Vital statistics :-immigration; illiteracy; poverty;
pauperism, etc. Use of statistics in social progress and control.
5. Educational sociology :-Problems of citizen training;
training for economic, social, cultural, and political life; ideals
of democracy.
MUSIC

The course in music includes
I
a study of such elementary facts as should be known by
those who teach music;
2
a survey of work for the eight grades with emphasis on
method;
3 observation, discussion and practice in the teaching of rote
songs;
4 chorus singing, to correlate with theory and grade work
when possible ;
5 acquaintance with standard music.
DRAWING

1

This course is intended to give instruction in the fundamental
principles of drawing.
A. General training in the representation of objects in
outline, mass, light and shade, in pencil, crayon, and color. The
representation work covers fruits, vegetables, flowers, objects
in perspective, pottery interiors, landscapes, animals and pose.
B. The work in mechanical drawing aims to teach
measuring, accuracy, scale, printing, simple constructive drawing, maps, floor plans and working drawings, with the end in
view that students shall be able to make and read working
drawings .
28

>0::
<(

0::

[l)

.J

C. The work in design aims at an appreciation of color
and line with the application and decorative aspects of flowers,
nature and abstract units. Poster design and lettering also
make up part of the course in design.
DRAWING

2

This course covers the methods of teaching drawing in the
elementary schools. It includes
A. Study of the course in drawing for the state schools;
interpretation; illustrating; and methods of teaching the lessons
in the grades. Correlation, construction, paper cutting and
drawing for the primary grades; drawing, mechanical drawing
and design for the grammar grades.
B. Blackboard drawing ;-plain explanatory drawing as a
necessary means of expression in the work of the teacher.
C. The course in art history aims at an appreciation and
familiarity with the fine things in any craft from architecture
to painting. Special emphasis is given to picture study. A
visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York city is
planned at the close of the course.
SEWING

1

The course in plain sewing includes practice in hand and machine work with instruction in the use of commercial patterns and
practice in making simple garments. At least three projects must
be complete during the Junior year. These have been planned, for
this year, to meet the requisitions for refugee garments, and have
included baby garments, children's dresses, and women's skirts.
SEWING

2

A more advanced course is planned to meet the needs of the
teacher in the elementary schools . It deals with the organization
and methods of teaching sewing for varying conditions of school
29

systems. This course includes the study of textiles, production,
manufacture, identification and use. The advanced garment making
includes at least three finished problems, which may be a shirt
waist, and dresses of light cotton materials, or serge skirts.

30

THE SCHOOL YEAIR

The normal school is in session the entire year except for
brief recesses between terms. The traditional year begins in September and ends 'in June. It includes thirty-six full weeks of five
days each, making the total length somewhat more than thirty-six
calendar weeks. Students regularly complete the course in two
such years.
Beginning this year the school has endeavored to provide for
those who wish to shorten their course, by maintaining a summer
term of its regular school work. This term begins with the usual
summer school ( page .40) and covers six weeks. By having longer
hours for classes and making the work intensive, it is possible <to
allow credit for this work equivalent to nine weeks of the usual
school year. Students entering in September and continuing
through this summer term may be able to complete their work nine
weeks ahead of the regular class-that is, early in April.
Students desiring to further economize their time may enter
the school at the beginning of its summer term in July, and continue
through the course without the usual vacation. These students will
do the work of the second summer term and may be entitled to
diplomas at the end of the first semester of the senior year, about
February first.
It is important that those desiring to enter in July should notify
the principal as early as possible, and not later than June 15. Classes
will not be formed in July unless the number of applicants is sufficient to warrant it.

31

ADMISSION

The privileges of the school are open to all persons of suitable
character and over sixteen years of age, who declare their serious
intent to teach in the public schools of Connecticut, and who satisfy
any one of the conditions enumerated below.
r. Graduates of four year courses in Connecticut high schools
who have attained an average rank of at least 75% on a passing
mark of 70% are admitted on the certificate of the high school
principal. This rank is equivalent to 66.6% on a passing mark of
60%, 70.84% on a passing mark of 65%, and 79.16% on a passing
mark of 75%.
2
Graduates of four year courses in Connecticut high schools
who have not attained the rank stated above, may be admitted on
passing an examination prepared by the principals of all Connecticut normal schools acting as a board.
These examinations will be held at each of the four normal
schools on June 16 and September 2. The June examination
may also be given at any high school in the state upon application to
the principal of the normal school at least one week before the date
stated.
Candidates must offer ten units, in subjects as set forth below.
A unit represents one year's study of the subject in a secondary
school-approximately one-quarter of a year's work. The subjects
and values are as follows :
English literature and composition, required
The remaining seven units are to be chosen from these:
Algebra
Geometry
Physics
Chemistry
Domestic science or manual training
Bookkeeping
History
Stenography
French

32

3 units
1 unit
1 unit
1 unit
1 unit
1 ·unit
1 unit
1 or 2 units
1 or 2 units
2 or 3 units

2 or 3
2 or 4
½ or 1
½ or 1
½ or 1
½ or 1
½ or 1
½ or 1

German
Latin
Drawing
Biology, botany, or zoology
Physical geography
Physiology and hygiene
Commerc ial geog raphy .
Arithmetic

units
units
unit
unit
un it
unit
unit
unit

3 Teachers are admitted upon presentation of a Connecticut
state teachers certificate.
4 Teachers are admitted upon satisfactory evidence of two
year's sucessful teaching.
INTENT TO TEACH

Particular attention is called to the requirement that all applicants for admi ss ion sign a written statement of their intention to
teach in the public schools of this state. It is undesirable that any
shall accept the prvileges of the school who do not feel that they
are working for this specific object.
TIME OF ENTRANCE

Classes are organized at the beginning of the first term in September, and at the opening of the summer term in July if the
minimum number of candidates appear (see page 31).
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

It is desirable that all who hope to enter the school should
make application to the principal in advance, stating the conditions
for entrance that they expect to satisfy.
It is especially important that those who expect to enter the
school at its summer term in July should make application to the
principal not later than June 15. Failure to do this may result in the
applicant's being refused admission at that time.
SPECIAL STUDENTS

Persons who are properly qualified are occasionally admitted
as special students in certain subjects or departments of the school.
No comprehensive statement can be made in regard to tnis, as each
case must be separately considered. Those who desire to do such
special work should communicate with the principal.
33

GENERAL INFORMATION
EXPENSES

The school makes no charge for tuition, laboratory fees , or the
use of books. All text books are provided by the school. Aside
from living expenses and travel, students have only the slight incidental costs of note books, pencils, etc.
Board and lodging at the dormitory are furnished at actual cost
of maintenance. It is necessary at present to ask $7.00 per week,
with a reduction for absence at week ends on the basis of fifteen
cents per meal. It is possible to get accommodation in private
houses at rates from $6.50 to $10.00.
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS

The dormitory is a new building, equipped with modern facilUnfortunately it can accommodate but twenty students.
Most of the boarding places are with families who can provide for
a small number of students. These are located in all parts of the
city. The minimum cost given above applies to cases where two or
three occupy a room and forego some conveniences.
·

ities.

It is of course important to arrange for lodging
coming if possible. Those who would like help in the
address the principal, stating as nearly as possible
accommodation they desire. The map of Danbury,
this catalogue, may be useful.

in advance of
matter should
what sort of
included with

NON-RESIDENCE

Daily travel from a distance is wasteful and is sure to interfere
with the performance of a student's best work. It is earnestly desired that members of the school shall arrange to live in Danbury if
possible. Lack of dormitory facilities prevents this being made a
requirement. It is required, however, that during their periods of
34

trammg all students shall observe the hours of attendance (8.15

a.m. to 4.30 p.m.) absolutely, and this makes commuting imprac-

ticable. All students who plan to commute should consult the training schedule on page 19.
SCHOLARSHIPS

An act of the state legislature, intended to secure trained
teachers for the smaller town s, provides scholarships whereby certain students may receive from the state the sum of $150 annually,
to be applied toward living expenses while at normal school. The
conditions under which such a scholarship may be awarded are
these:
The towns contemplated in the terms of this statute are those
having an assessed valuation (set by the state board of equalization) of not over one and one-half millions.
Each of such towns may at all times be represented by one
student in a normal school under the terms of this act.
The student must be recommended by the school board of such
a town.
Such a student must agree to teach in one of the towns described by this statute for three years following graduation unless
excused by the state board of education, except by repaying to the
state the whole of such portion of the scholarship as they shall
require.
The benefits of this scholarship shall be withdrawn from any
student whose work or conduct at the school fails to meet the
standards required by the faculty.
EMPLOYMENT

The school cannot guarantee employment to its graduates. Yet
it may be said, as a matter of fact, that there has not been a year
in its history when the demands upon the school for teachers were
not more numerous than the members of the graduating class.
Those of the class of 1918 went to positions where the salary for
35

NOTES
FOR STUDENTS AND PARENT&
THE WORK

The normal school is a professional school with a definite purpose ; its students are assumed to know that purpose and to be
here with intent to work for its accomplishment. They should come
prepared to find methods and requirements that differ in some ways
from those of their previous experience. It is expected that each
student will try, from the outset, to do all her work faithfully-as
is fitting in those who are soon to assume a teacher's responsibility
for others.
STUDENT RESPONSIBIT.ITY

Particularly students are asked to assume responsibility for
their own welfare. They are expected to try and guage their own
work fairly and to confer with the several instructors from time to
time, especially if they have any reason to doubt whether they are
properly meeting requirements.
nTNESS FOR TEACHING

The faculty recognizes its inability to say who will and who
will not make a good teacher. Hence it is our policy to give ample
opportunity for demonstrating ability even to those who seem unprom1smg. Yet when the faculty as a whole becomes convinced
that a student is essentially not quafified for the position of a public
school teacher, the student is notified that she cannot be considered
a candidate for a diploma, and may be asked to withdraw. This is
regarded as but fair to the student, who may then direct her energies
into more suitable channels.
REPORTS

A full report of her standing is given to each student in writing
at the end of every semester. At such time the student will be
37

notified also if there is any change in her status as a regular candidate for a diploma.
Parents who have not seen the student's report ·by February 15
and July I are requested to confer with the principal of the school.
Students and parents a re entitled to informal reports· at any
time and are invited to ask for them.
A TTENDANCE

Much of the work of school is of such a nature that it cannot
be "made up" by the customary method of outside conferences.
Absence from any part of the school work involves a loss of certain
credits from the student's rank in that course. Special consideration
is given by the faculty to cases of absence due to causes that meet
their app.roval.
Students at the normal school are required to be in their
appointed class rooms at 8.50 A.M. and 1.30 P.M. They are expected to remain in attendance and to be employed at school duties
until I 1.50 A.fyl. and 3.30 P.M., whether they have classes in session or not.
The hours for students in training are 8. 15 to 12.00 A.M. and
I.IO to 4.30 P.M. A student who needs special help may be required by the training teacher to remain until 4.45. Outside
preparation of work which the average student can satisfactorily
comp!ete in two hours is required. Any student who is unable to
complete her daily work in that time is expected to consult the
director of training.
OU TSIDE REGU LATIONS

Students who are living away from their homes are required to
observe the same rules and regulations as govern life at the dormitory.
38

GYMNASIUM

Every student entering the school should be provided with a
gymnasium costume, consisting of black gymnasium or tennis shoes,
black stockings, black bloomers, and white middy blouse.
BULLETINS

Official announcements are posted on the bulletin board m the
corridor on the first floor. Members of the school are expected to
consult this daily.
STUDENT WELFARE

The principal is always glad to receive and confer with any
student upon matters concerning their work or welfare as members
of the school. In order to make such opportunity easily available,
a committee of the faculty is appointed also for the puropse. The
membership of this committee may be learned from the bulletin
board or by application at the office.

39

"

SUMMER SCHOOL

In order to make its plant as useful as possible the school has
maintained a summer session nearly every year since 1907.
Originally this session constituted a four weeks' course for
teachers and those who contemplated teaching without normal
training. This has always been well attended and is still the largest
department of the summer school.
During this summer school there have been also for several
years a two weeks' session of the state supervisors of schools and
a ten days' institute for librarians. The supervisors' meetings have
been under the direction of Mr Charles D Hine, secretary of the
state board of education, and the library institute has been in
charge of the state inspector of public libraries.
Three new departments were established m the summer of
1918, each of which proved so successful that it will doubtless be
cont'inued. These were the regular summer term for normal school
students (page 31), the department for high school teachers (page
43), and a department for teachers in evening schools for foreigners.
A folder giving details of the summer school is issued about
the first of June. Those desiring information may perhaps find
what they seek in the catalogue of the 1918 summer school, which
will be sent on request.

40

OFFICERS OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL

1918

JR

PERKINS Principal

INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS
N ormal School Department
ES EvENDEN

Teachers College, Columbia University

Education

AMY GAINES .

Nor mal School D anbury

ELIZABETH H ANLY .

Normal School Danbury

I SABELLE MACKAY

Norma l School D anbury

Methodology

Methodology

S ociology

High School D ep artm e nt
MORTON SNYDER Director

H artford

E S EvENDEN

Teachers College, Columbia University

Ed1e cat-io n

WINFRED I NGLIS

Newark Academy

Algebra

MARY F RANCES MERRICK

Montclair High School

French

LILLIAN R RUTLEDGE

New Haven High School

English

H LESLIE SA WYER

L ebanoru N H

Science

ETHEL W WEBB

H igh schoo l

T eachers College, Columbia University

History

Library In stitute

BELLE HOLCOMB JOHNSON
FRANCES HOBART

Hartford
Cambridge Vt

Elementary Teachers' Course
LESLIE E ABBOTT

Danbury

Agrirnlture

L K CHANCE .

Watertown

Arithmetic

HO CLOUGH .

.

.

.

Hartford

Geogra phy and C11rre11t Hist ory

41

ws

DAKIN , ..
.
Scho ol Managemenl
ANNA STEWART Fox
Folk Dancing and Games
AMY W GAINES
Reading
L T GARRISON

Hartford
New York City
Normal School Danbury
Willimantic

H ist or y

LOTHROP D HIGGINS

Normal School Danbury

Hygiene

HARRY HOUSTON

Normal School

Penmanship

ISABELLE MACKAY .

New Haven

Normal School Danbury

Draiving and Sewing

J L MEADER
E nglish
LEWIS S MILLS
Citiz enship
E w NEWTON

H artford
Pla inville
Boston

Mu.sic

HELEN S LEAVITT

Boston

Mi,sic

H LESLIE SA WYER

L eba non

Science

H

Model School Department
MARTHA L CowAN Director
IRENE D ALLEN
CLARA BEBEAU
MARIE C COLEMAN
HELEN F DARAGAN
MARY VIRGINIA HOULIHAN
ISABEL HUBER
ANNA E KEATING .
MARGARET F LYNCH
ALICE M MEAD
ANNETA MONROE
KATHARINE A MORRIS
ELLEN E OLSON
JESSIE K TORRACA .
MARGUERITE WALSH
HANSINE D WIEDL .
MARGUERITE E WHEELER
Kindergarlen
SAMUEL j BROWN
AN POTTER

Normal School Danbury
Danbury
Putnam
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury

Evening School Department
H artford
Willimantic

42

HIGH SCHIOOL TEACHERS

This school has long felt that the work of state normal schools
should include provision for the preparation of high school teachers.
Its courses of professional instruction and the opportunity for experience with pupils under the supervision of competent teachers,
make its two-year course equal in value to the first two years of
college for those who contemplate high school teaching.
Several institutions of college grade at present accept the
diploma of this school as the equivalent of two years' work toward
certain of their degrees. Columbia, Brown, and Boston universities ,
:md the University of Maine will thus allow cred it for two years'
work under certan conditions. We look forward with confidence to
the time when Connecticut normal schools will be on a four-year
basis and grant degrees. At present there is no better preparation
for high school teaching than the two-year professional course at
normal school followed by two years of special subjects at one of
the universities named above.
This school is now making special provision for high school
teachers in one department at the summer session. This department offers a six weeks' course for teachers in secondary school
subjects, under instructors whose standing guarantees a high grade
of work and whose experience assures the practical value of their
courses. A circular describing this summer high school department
will be sent on application.

43

ORPOIR TUNITY FOR TEACHERS

The best of teachers have always been drawn from the class
of those who are moved by the high ideal of human service with no
consideration of material compensation. Many who have never before thought of it have been aroused by the great deeds and sacrifices of a stricken world, to a desire that their own lives shall count
for something of genuine worth. All thoughtful people must now
as never before appreciate the important place of public education.
Russia, where popular ignorance has led to colossal ruin and misery
beyond all conception; Germany, whose system of public education,
closely controlled by a few, made a nation so powerful in blindly
doing the will of that few; and America with her free and equal
schools, whose whole resources are gathered by the peoeple's will
in defense of world liberty: we cannot think of these without a new
and deep respect for the place of public education. And as our
schools have now borne fruit in an enlightened nation capable of
meeting a great crisis, the need for their important work will by no
means end with the coming of peace. There is no work in the
world, in which women are employed for pay, that is more worthy
of her own best effort and the respect of others than that of a public
school teacher.
This school has never been able to supply the yearly demand for
its graduates. The present shortage of teachers adds a note of duty
to the call for those who would serve their country in the great work
of educating its citizens. With a deeper realization by the public of
the importance of our schools, which is even now beginning to show
results, it is confidently believed that the appeal to those who would
render service as teachers can be supplemented by the hope of
material attractions.

44

,.

STUDENTS
GRADUATES , 1918

address

name

Glen brook
Sandy Hook
Sandy Hook
Hawleyville
Oxford
Danbury
Waterbury
Danbury
. Litchfield
Thomaston
Waterbury
Waterbury
New Milford
Ridgebury
Danbury
Bethel
Greenwich
Torrington
Greenwich
Danbury
South Norwalk
Danbury
·Danbury
Waterbury
Waterbury
Stamford
Greenwich
Glenbrook
Hotchkissville
Greenwich
Danbury
Waterbury
East Port Chest.er

Andersen Edythe Violet
Anthes Mabel-Ann
*Anthes Viola Miller
Bale Clara Philomena
Beecher Nona
Belden Mary Sherman
Biron Laura Alice
Bissell Marjorie Estelle
Blackburne Anita Genivieve
Blakeslee Emma 'Mildred
*Blodgett Elizabeth Morrissey
Bolger Rosaline M
Bongiorno Marie V
Byrons Edna Frances
Callahan ,Margaret Alberta
Carroll Margaret E
Chard Isabella
Clarke Josephine
Colgan Margaret Angela
Corbett Anna May
Craw Helen Marie
*Crotty Helen Angela
*Crotty Isabel Rose
Dillon Margaret Imelda
Donahue Katherine Thersa
Donnelly Irene Catherine
Doran Esther Marie
Elam .Laureda A
*Fanning Mary Agnes
FitzSimmons Edythe
Gallagher Grace Helen
Gallagher Hazel Veronica
Graf Marga rete T
*Diploma certificate

45

name

address

Greene Josephine Helen
Hamlin Gertrude Pearl
Hanna Grace Elizabeth
Haugh Kathleene DeSales
Hayes Mary Elizabeth
Hough •L illian Delia
Hugins Marian J
Hynes Rose Mary
Ivers Katherine Ursula
*Jacot Eveline Jeanne
Jennings Mildred
J oselovsky Minnie
J uengst Isabel Arnold
Keane Anna Mildred
Keane Mary Madeline
Keeler Ethel
Keiber Marguerite
Kelleher Anna Ursula
Kiely Helen Vera
Kinsella Mary Elizabeth
Lannen Mary Elizabeth
Larssen Helen Madeline
Lawlor Anna Marie
Levvy Irene Uella
Little Eva May
Lynch Mary Frances
McCarthy Florence Marie
McDonald Helen Rosemary
McNerney ·Margaret Clare
MacEntee Esther Bernadette
Mackay Jean
Maher Marguerite H
Main Mildred Cynthia
O'Donnell Catherine Cecilia
Olson Ellen Elizabeth
Olson Ellen Sofia

Danbury
Sharon
Bethel
Norwalk
Torrington
Waterbury
Canaan
Stamford
Glenbrook
Sandy Hook
Rowayton
East Norwalk
Danbury
Danbury
Sandy Hook
Norwalk
Clinton
Bell Haven
Waterbury
Norwalk
Waterbury
Stamford
Waterbury
New Milford
Stamford
Danbury
Danbury
Waterbury
South Norwalk
Glenbrook
Mt Vernon NY
Naugatuck
Norwalk
Waterbury
Danbury
Stamford

• Diploma cert1ficate

46

O NE OF THE CLASS ROOMS

-:

/

name

address

Perkins Lois
Pierce Julia Carolyn
Porter Edna Ruth
Ray Katherine
Riordan Dorothy Mildred
Scanlon Catherine Agnes
Schilt Lydia May
Seaburg Ida Virginia
Seymour Helen Louise
Shepard Katherine Anna
*Silva Suzanne Louise
Skehan Winifred Bernadette
Smith Josephine Flower
Smith Margaret Esthe r
Stagg Ethelwyn Martha
Stearns Frances
Torraca Jessie Kath ryn
Walsh Marguerite Dickens
Walsh Martha Hardick
Wilson Lois Emily
Wright Edith
*Zinser Alma Babette

Cornwall Bridge
Southbury
Danbury
Waterbury
Waterbury
Sandy Hook
Portchester N Y
Bethel
Riverton
Waterbury
Bridgeport
Waterbury
Woodbury
Riverside
Danbury
Bethel
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury
Danbury

*Diploma certificate

91

SENIORS

name

Bailey Maud Tamar
Beecher Bertha Marion
Bennett Eleanor R
Boland Elizabeth
Boland Mary
Boland Mary H
Buell Alice Jennie
Carlucci Mary Carmell
Clark Harriet
Collins Frances R
Corbett Margaret M

home address

Thomaston box 193
Redding
_Brookfield box 8
Ridgefield
Ridgefield
Danbury 7 Foster
Ridgefield box 210
Stamford RF D 28 (Cos Cob)
Cornwall (Litchfield)
Waterbury 52 Railroad Hill
Danbury 11 Cherry

47

Danbury address

190 White
121 Triangle
15 Osborne
15 Osborne
20 New
225 White
190 White
121 Triang le

name

home address

Danbury address

Darling Laura
Derwin Estelle
Dick Bessie Lillian
Doran Blanche E
Doyle Helen F
Egan Mayla
Fahey Clementine
Flaherty Anna Mary
Foley Vera
Fuhrmann M Liddy
Gallagher Josephine
Gorman Gertrude J
Griffin Eleanor
Holmes Ruth Marion
J ouret Teresa Gertrude
Kinner Carthene Starr
Leonard Marie G
MacNulty <Marion
McCormick Agnes Leona
Meinke Lydia
Nyberg Nellie

Kent box 144
Waterbury 7 Ridgewood
Danbury Great Pasture rd
Waterbury 317 Hamilton av
Greenwich Torth st
Danbury 121 South
Suffield
Waterbury 72 South Leonard
Torrington 89 Pythian av
Greenwich 164 Railroad av
Danbury 22 Housman
Bethel 63 Grassy Plain
Norwalk 10 Reed
Danbury 12 Foster
Greenwich (Glenbrook)
Danbury 36 Foster
Danbury 14 Stillman av
Danb ury 18 Fairfield av
Stamford 807 Main
Meriden 74 South Third
Nau gatuck (Union City 24 City

Pickett -Marion Ruth
Ryder Maud
Spellman Irene
Throop Amelia A
Watson Florence Lorraine
Wix te d Edith E

Danbury 40 Division
Norwalk 7 North av
Waterbury 380 West 1Main
Morris (Lakeside)
Torrington 108 Pearl
Bethel Grassy Plain st

182 White
121 Tri.angle
238 White
190 White

182 White
218 White
121 Triang le
225 White
85 West
18 Locust av

190 White
Hall av)
182 White
15 Osborne

42 Ke eler
20 New
218 White

38

JUNIORS

Alley Inda D
Bolles Beatrice
Bridge May
Chard Marthena
Crane Josephine M
Doll Florence

Greenwich (Banskville N Y)
16 Locust av
New Milford
Greenwich 33 Spring
16 'Locust av
Greenwich
Stamford 20 Winthrop
Greenwich (Port Chester N Y)
225 White

48


name

Doran -Mildredth A
Dunham S Ruth
Esther Durkin
Fagan ,M argaret E
Fairchild Geraldyn
Fuhrmann Helen K
Fulton Edna
Greene Mary Agnes
Guerrera Leta
Haug Ella
Hearst Josephine
Hurlihe Teresa
Johnson Emily
Kessler Rebecca
Leland Marian E
Light Alice Sophia
Livingstone Margaret M
McCoy ·Genevieve
McDonald Kathryn
McGlynn Mary iM
Moran Catharine Gertrude
Mullins Katherine
Mulrooney Mary C
Neuger Goldie
Olson Edith Alfreda
Phelan Esther
Riley Margaret V
Rudder Beatrice
Sheridan Catherine
Singer Helen A
Skasko Stephania
Slauson Natalie
Smith Frances
Sturdevant Helen
Sweeney Irene B
Tanner Lucy E

home address

Danbury address

238 White
Waterbury 317 Hamilton av
Danbury 64 West Wooster
Greenwich 36 Prospect
Norwalk 6 Center av
Bethel box 3
Greenwich 164 Railroad av
225 White
Greenwich (Port Chester N Y R '.F Dl)
190 White
Danbury 8 Wilson
Waterbury 90 Scovill st
225 White
Greenwich (Sound Beach)
Ridgefieid R F D 45
Danbury 17 Mallory
190 White
Greenwich 189 Connecticut av
South Norwalk 10 Clay
190 White
Stamford 35 St George av
Ridgefield
Bethel R F D
Danbury 30. Mountainville av
190 White
Waterbury 429 Cooke
Ridgefield L -b ox 13
Waterbury 935 East Main
Waterbury 110 South
Stamford 67 'Sound View av
Darien
Danbury box 19 R F D 3
Waterbury 196 Hamilton av
Waterbury 75 South
South Norwalk 108 S outh Main
Waterbury 180 South Elm
Danbury 13 Starr av
Danbury 01 Fairfield av
Rowayton box 78
Stamford 37 Limerick
Danbury 89 Town Hill av
18 Locust av
Greenwich 35 Orchard pl
218 White
Warren
49

name

Thurner Marie Harriet
Troy Mary M
Weiss Grace
Whalen Mary
Wilson Marjorie
Young Antoinette M

home address

Bethel box 605
Stamford 16 Frederick
Stamford (Springdale)
Waterbury 143 South
Weston (1Westport)
Danbury 46 Maple av

,50

Danbury adclress.

190 White

4&

SUMMER SCHOOL
NORMAL SCHOOL SECTION

name

town

Anthes 'Mabel A
Beecher Bertha M
Boland Elizabeth
Boland ,Mary M
Bolles Beatrice A
Carlucci Mary C
Carroll Marguerite
Darling Laura
Davis Prudence M
Doyle Helen F
Egan Mayla
Fisher Jessie M
Gallagher Josephine
Hayes :Mary E ·
Kessler Rebecca
Liv ings ton e Margaret
MacNulty Marion
McCoy Genevieve
J ouret Teresa
Ryder Maud
Sweeney Irene B
Wixted Julia

Sandy Hook
Redding
Ridgefield
Ridgefield
New Milford
Cos Cob
Bethel
Kent
Noank
Greenwich
Danbury
N oroton Heights
Danbury
Torrington
South Norwalk
Bethel
Danbury
Danbury
Greenwich
Norwalk
Greenwich
Bethel
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS' SECTION

Allison Alice
Anderson Esther J
Archer Muriel E
Ayer Lucie A
Bailey Annie E
Bailey I vanette
Baldwin Harriet C
Bebeau Anna
Beckwith 1Mrs Wm H

Rockville
Danbury
Bethel
Norwich
Columbia
Higganum
Guilford
Mechanicsville
Canton Center
51

22

name

town

Beebe Florence Novelle
Bieling Mary E
Billings Priscilla Alden
Bjornberg Helen Vic to ria
Blake Mrs Ella iM
Blakeslee Marion E
Bourke Katharine T
Bowler Ruby R
Bradley Lillian J
Brown D oris M
Brown Eileen E
Browning Sibyl
Bruce Ethel Amy
Caffrey !Margaret L
Candee Nellie A
Carlson Dora M
Carpenter Louise
Champion Miriam T
Cheney Ruth
Clark 11,aura D
Clemens Cora
Coe Beatrice
Colburn Mabel H
Coleman Alice C
Col lins Grace A
Cone Gladys E
Creagh Esther M
Creamer Dorothy
Culhane Edith L
Cummings Mi ldred V
Davis Ethel M
Davis Marjorie Roberta
Dearden Alice N
Derenthal E lizabeth
Dombroski Clara
Donalds Jessie C
Downs Alta S

Hadlyme
Stonington
Woodstock
Danbury
Lebanon
Thomaston
West Wi llington
Thomaston
Win sted
Colchester
Jewett City
Ea st Lyme
Killingly
P lymouth
Gaylordsville
Oneco
South Lyme
Danbury
Bloomfield
Phoenixville
Riverton
Stafford
Middletown
Danbury
Hadlyme
Bethel
Goshen
Danbury
Willimantic
Somers
New York City
Rockville
Madison
No rwich
Canaan
Bethany

52

name

town

Danbury
New Haven
Bridgeport
South Norwalk
New Milford
Danbury
Lakeville
Southwick
Clintonville
New Haven
Canaan
Westfield !Mass
Roxbury
Collinsville
Danbury
Bethel
Danbury
South Manchester
Amherst Mass
Brookfield
Thompsonville
Hawleyville
Guilford
Bethel
Danbury
Danbury
Abington
New Canaan
Brooklyn
Colchester
Collinsville
East Hartland
Bridgeport
Pomfret Center
Chester
Litchfield
Hawleyville

Drumm Susan S
English Marguerite G
Enlund Ruth G
Fallon C Augusta
Fish Ada M ae
Flanagan M C
Flynn Katherine J
Foster Faith
Fowler Ruth E
Frederick Grace Louise
Frink Blanche
Frisbie Mildred E
Frizzell Mary 'E
Froidevaux Charlotte Louise
Gage Susan M
Ganly Irene
Geary Josephine
Gerard Anna M
Glazier Leta
Goetz E lisabeth
Goodwin Mildred A
Gray Marion C
Griswold Harriet R
Hanna Ruth
Hannan Edna
Hannan Marion J
Harris Adana G
Harris Lulu B
Havens Stell a
Hei lweil Sarah
Hohbein Ruby Marie
Holborn Olive C
Hopkins Rose ll a A
Horton Mary E
Houghtaling Cora
Ives Sylvia E
James Catherine A
53

name

town

Johnson Jennie M
Johnson Julia Mathilda
Johnson Margaret
Johnson Ruth Florn
Jones Margaret L
Jones Minnie A
Jouret May J
Katinas Lucy E
Keane B Cecilia
Keating Florence M
Kelley Celia A
Kelly Louise J
Kelley 1Mary E
Kelly Mary T
Keniston Hilma
Kiernan Catherine M
Klein Ethel Lounsbury
Knapp Esther
Korn Ruby
Lafleur Delvena
Lamb Helen May
Lathrop Eva
Lee Madeleine C
LeFebure iMarj orie
Leonard Adelaide
Lillis Ella
Lindeburg Bessie
Linley Emma L
Linxweiler Joanna C
Lynch Josephine
McDowell Katherine
McGrath Nellie
McIntosh Florence May
McQuade Anna
Mackey Delphina
Maguire Louise F
Masinda Wilhelmina

Clinton
Pomfret Center
Collinsville
West Cornwall
Riverside
Eastford
Glenville
Granby
Sandy Hook
Danbury
Pomfret Center
Sandy Hook
Pomfret Center
Sandy Hook
Torrington
Lakeville
Mansfield Depot
Wethersfield
Granby
Chestnut Hill
Sharon
Rockville
Danbury
Collinsville
Bournedale Mass
Sandy Hook
South Norwalk
Bridgeport
Westport
New Milford
Bethel
Simsbury
Willimantic
Chaplin
Ellington
Danbury
West Willington
54

name

town

Maynard Marion
Migone Theresa
Miller Amy I
Minor Nellie B
Morgan Edna M
Morgan Mabel L
Murphy Anna G
Newport BB
Northrop Laura D
Northrop Marjorie S
Nourse Gladys Howard
O'Connor Mary J
Parker Doris V
Parker Eva
Pasani Jane M
Pease Nellie M ,
Perkins Gladys J
Peterson Edith
Pomeroy Blanche S
Potter Mary F
Prescott Blake Daniels
Prince Hazel M
Redding Nellie H
Reel Rosa E
Reidy Mary
Reynolds Harriet
Richardson Elsie •M ay
Roberg Bernard
Roode Frances M
Root Elise
Ross Margaret J
Roy Irene E
Russ B lanche Rose
Ryan Sara C
Sabin Clara B
Schoeller Mary
Scovill Delia

Putnam
Bethel
Hartland
Roxbury
South Norwalk
Stepney Depot
Sandy Hook
Bethel
Danbury
Stepney Depot
Bridgeport
Colchester
Thomaston
East Lyme
Davisville R I
Tariffville
Litchfield
Thompson
New Milford
Putnam
Bethel
North Grosvenor-Dale
Bridgeport
Canaan
New London
Collinsville
Litchfield
Jewett City
Danbury
Southington
Collinsville
Pomfret Center
Torringford
Falls Village
Southbury
Woodbury

55

town

name

Danbury
Middletown
East Canaan
Danbury
Brookfield Center
Putnam
Durham
Winsted
North Windham
Unionville
Westport
Hadlyme
Bloomfield
Woodstock
Putnam
Putnam
Putnam
Danbury

Sherman Vivia B
Stevens Edna C
Stevens Philinda
Stewart Burchia E
Stoddard Clara M
Swenson Ellen Helen
Thayer Marjorie Howard
Thorne Olga Ellen
Tucker Bernece
Vienot Catherine C
Vincent Viola
Warner Musa
Weiant Ruth E
White Agnes C
Whitman Adabelle
Whitney Olive A
Williams Eleanor L
Young Dorothy G

175

HIGH SCHOOL SECTION

Ackley Luna 1M
Barnum Florence S
Bissell Marjorie
Brennan Nonie
Brotherton Josephine H
Downs Doris S
Drennan Agnes G
Dyer Mrs Betty A
Campbell Grace M
Gallagher Grace
Green Dulce
Green Rudolph
Judd Katharine Linsly
Montgomery Mildred C
O'Connor Mary
Perkins Margaret W
Ritchie Janie Kathleen

Bristol
Danbury
Danbury
Moriah NY
Bethel
Danbury
Middletown
Wallingford
Middletown
Danbury
Hartford
Hartford
Wallingford
Griswold
Branford
Danbury
Mill Plain

56

17

SUPERVISION SECTIOX

nam e

town

Montowese
Willimantic

Allen D C
Bliss Wm H
Brown Raymond N
Chance L K
Chapman H B
Chittenden Harold E
Clapp Frank W
Clement Frank H P
Clough Herbert 0
Connolly James F
Dakin W S
Dows Joseph Wm
Dunfield I Burten
Foote 1Robert E
Garrison L T
Green DA
Harrington F E
Hickson Leo T
Hine Charles ,D
Ireland E Ward
Jeffords H Morton
Johnson Arthur C Jr
Libby HS
Light N 'Searle
Lord A B
Lowell O E
L und Russe ll F
MdLean J B
Mandrey W H
Mayhew Alfred F
Maynard A lbert Thomas
Meader J L
Mills Lewis S
Morris iFrank A
Perry Stephen K
Shearer Fred W

Watertown
Hartford
Canaan
Willimantic
Jewett City
West Hartford
Middletown
Hartford
New Haven
Torrington
Chester
Willimantic
Norwal k
Putnam
Newtown
Hartford
Hartford
Waterbury
Portland
Colchester
Hartford
Willimantic
Norwich
Glastonbury
Simsbury
Warehouse Poi nt
Wallingford
Ridgefie ld
New Milford
Plainville
Danbury
Hartford Vt
Norwich

57

name

town

Simpson AD
Smith Eldridge
Small Ernest W
Tabor Aubrey W
Teag ue William iM
Vogel George J
Warner C L
Westbrook CH
Wheeler Carlon E
Young Arthur L

Winsted
Ballston Spa N Y
Thomaston
Washington
North Canaan
Torrington
Salisbury
West -Cornwali
ew London
Branford

46

LIBRARY SECTION

Farmington
Danbury
Danbury
Oakville
Bethel
Danbury
Sandy Hook
Waterbury
Branford
Branford
Saybrook
Suffield
Westbrook
Moodus
Cheshire
Middlefield

Bridgeman Elizabeth M
Campbell Mrs Margaret
Conniff Kathlene
Cooper Marion K
Coulter Frances R (•Mrs)
Dunham Ruth
George Marilla B
Nolan Agnes
Preble Helen I
Reynolds Vega
Sheffield Anna D
Spencer Madeline H
Stannard Lynda H
Sweet Myra Cone
Van de Bogart Ruth B
Watrous Alice E

EVENING SCHOOL SECTION

Danbury
Hartford
Hartford
Meriden
Burnside
P lainv1;le

Beach Marie Scott
Cady iMary E
Curran Elizabeth .M
Comstock Cornelia A
Hickey Teresa Helen
Harris Alice M
58

16

town

name

Meriden
Danbury
South Norwalk
New Haven
Danbury
Danbury
New Haven

Harris Edna M
Horning AK
Hurd Frances A
Lum May Josephine
McCarthy Evelyn
McCarthy Julia L
Morris Elizabeth Woodbridge
(Mrs Chas G)
Murphy Josephine
Popolizio Marie S
Potter Franc E
Rozelle Lida A
Sammis Edward A
Scollin Anna E
Sponheimer ,Mary Agnes
Torraca Jessie Kathryn
Woodruff Gertrude A

Danbury
New Haven
West Hartford
Terryville
Stamford
Danbury
Ansonia
Danbury
New Britain

22

SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION

Elementary teachers' department
Evening school
High school
Library
ormal school
Supervision
Instructors

175

22
17

16

22

46
46

344
SUMMARY

Graduates
Seniors
Juniors
Children in training schools
Children in kindergarten
Summer school .

59

,,

91

38
48
937

40
344



C:

FOLK DANCING

RURAL TRAINING SCHOOL : MIRY BROOK

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