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FEBRUARY, 1917

Published -M onthly by the

NATIONAL·AMERICAN·WOMAN ·SUffRAGE ·ASSOCIATION
171 MADISON AVE.
VOLUME III

NEW ·YORK CITY.
NUMBER 2

r
~ATIONAL

Page 2

SUFFRAGE NEWS

NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS
Continuing the
HEADQUARTERS NEWS LETTER

A printed attempt to maintain intimate contact
between the N ational American Woman Suffrage
Association and its thousands of membe·rs throughout
the country.
_,

__

Published once a month by the National American
·w oman Suffrage Association, at 171 Madison Ave.,
New York, N. Y . Subscription price per year, 25c.
Entered as second class matter Oct. 6, 19ltl, at Post Office, New.York, N . Y.,
under the act of March 3, 1879.

RosE YouNG, Editor
National Amerlcan Woman

Sutlra~e

H onOt'ar y President
DR. ANNA H owARD SHAW

M RS. FRAN K J. S HULE R

Presidenl

Treasurer

M RS. C ARRIE CHAPMAN CATT

M Rs. HENRY WADE RoGERS

Fir3t Vice·President

First A uditor

MRs . WALTER M cNAB MILLE R

MISS HELOISE M EYER

Second Vict ·Prtsidtnl

Seeond A uditor

M Rs . S TANLEY M cCoRMICK

M RS. P ATTIE RUFFNER JACO BS

Third V ice· President
G. O GDE N



1 626~g~~·{:{;~~ Ave.,

RecordinJ Secrelary

Washington, D. C.

MRS . TUOMAS jEFFE RSON S MITH

EDITORIAL

[

..1-----~

Salutatory
With its hand on its heart, and the one-time Headquarters News LetteJ' behind its back, the NATIONAL
SuFFRAGE NEWS assures the suffragi st reading public
of its desire to serve and to please.
As the official organ of the National American
Woman Suffrage Association, it should surely be able
to do the one. As suffrage news for 1917 promises to
be uniformly good news, it may hope, by the mere
exercise of its chronicling fun ction, to do the other.

* * *

Keeping up with Suffrage
On the next page will be found what is, at the
moment of going to press, the latest suffrage map for
1917. But no guarantee is given that it will be the
latest by the time this book is opened. Keeping up
with suffrage is a precarious undertaking in this
auspicious year 1917. Hardly was the ink dry on
the new map which added North Dakota with her
five electoral votes to the suffrage column, when word
came over the wires, "We Win Ohio." And that nice
new map is out of date before it is in circulation.
However, it can be borne. It's worth a new map
to get the twenty-fou r electoral votes of the great
commonwealth of Ohio. The Illinois victory planted
the suffrage banner fairl y in the Middle West. Ohio's
triumph carries it on into the North Central States.
Count East from West, the Yukon to Lower California, and you find the Pacific Coast tier of states,
from Alaska through British Columbia, Washington,
Oregon, and California, white for suffrage. The next

*

Some are saying, "If the United States becomes
involved in war, we stand ready to serve our country."
Others are saying, "Utttil the United States becomes
involved in war, we will not by thought or promise
heighten the tension."
On these two conjunctions have hung vivid differences of opinion during the present national crisis.
Violent militarists would keep the country steeped in
preparedness thought and galvanized with preparedness activity the year round. Violent pacifists would
so subordinate preparedness that preparedness ceases
to be the word. Defense becomes the word. With
the passivist defense ceases to be the word, submission
becomes the word.
There is hardly a suffragist who is not a pacifist.
But pacifism knows many degrees of self-commitment.
Pacifism is an ideal toward which we are all struggling. The essential point about an ideal is the point
of application. Pacifists are in no sort of unity on it. ·
Witness the inability of the peace societies to get together on any constructive program. In spite of
which, one is glad to concede that if pacifism's great
leverage is not, as yet, inherent in the ability to work
out these practical adjustments, it does inhere in the
creating of a mind for peace, the will for peace. Its
surest point of application lies in prevention.
Women are averse to war. They are averse to the
creation of a war psychology in advance of the event.
They deprecate ill-considered war talk in the name of
patriotism. They want peace. They· work for peace.
They pray for peace. If peace can be compelled, they
will compel it. But suffragists have shown that women
will rally around America's need, if war can no longer
be averted.
Suffragists are not usually considered precipitate
in patriotism. Indeed, the burden of accusation has
always come the other way around. Of all people,
wordy jingo-ism has left the suffragist untouched. The
fact that suffragists the country over deem the moment
fitting for discussion of, and action on, the crisis which
the nation confronts is distressing evidence of the
imminence of the crisis.

I

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"If" Or "Until"?

Congressional Committee

MISS ESTH ER

]

Association

CorrtsPoltding Stcrtlary

tier from the Northwest Territory, through Alberta,
Idaho, Utah and Arizona, is likewise solid suffrage
land. Saskatchewan, Montana, Wyoming arid Colorado keep the ranks intact down to New Mexico. In
the fifth tier, Manitoba, North Dakota and Kansas
hold the balance against South Dakota, Nebraska,
Oklahoma and Texas. There is not a suffrage state
in the sixth tier. But in the seventh tier stands Illinois, and in the ninth is now Ohio. How is Indiana
in the eighth tier, with Illinois on one side and Ohio
on the other, to resist the pressure? It is not believed
that she will.
The Ohio triumph brings the number of electors
whom women have a voice in choosing to 120. Equal
in importance is the fact that Ohio, the fourteenth
state to be listed in the suffrage column, has become
the new salient, or wedge, pushing eastward.
Who can doubt that the thin black line of Atlantic
States will soon be penetrated by the new democratic
faith? By referendum or by legislative enactment
some state is sure soon to let the light break through.
\i\1ill it be New York?

NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS

PRESIDENTIAL SUFFRAGE CAMPAIGN
DATES BACK TO 1873

I

With two single victories already scored in the presidential suffrage campaign, the "big drive" goes merrily _on. Legislatures seem almost uniformly favorable
to the presidential suffrage idea. Probably this .is because of the obvious justice of the proposition. What
a legislature can pass, it can repeal. If presidential
suffrage does not prove expedient in any State, the
legislature of that State can set the matter right by
taking away the measure of franchise it has bestowed.
In Ohio that measure varies somewhat from the measure granted in the two other states that have presidential suffrage. In both Illinois and North Dakota
women have municipal suffrage under the provisions
of their presidential suffrage bill. In Ohio they will
get presidential suffrage only.
The determination of what citizens may possess the
right to vote for presidential electors rests with the
legislatures of the several States. Any legislature may
· extend that privilege to women. Members of those
political parties which in National and State platforms
have endorsed woman suffrage by State action cannot logically withhold support to the extension of this
form of suffrage to the women of their respective
States. This proposal was first introduced in the Indiana legislature in 1873 and several States have had
the measure under consideration since that time. It
has frequently passed one House or the other, but
hesitation upon the ground of the possible unconstitutionality of the law and the non-support of political
parties has delayed its establishment. A bill containing
a presidential suffrage clause passed both Houses of .
the Illinois legislature and became a law in 1913 and
has since become known as the Illinois Woman Suffrage Law.
The question of the constitutionality of the Illinois
Law has been raised in the courts several times and
every time it has been sustained by the Supreme Court.
One of these cases tested the constitutionality of the
section of the law permitting the women to vote for
presidential electors and the Supreme Court upheld
the constitutionality of the Jaw. It was held by some
persons that the vote of Illinois would not be counted
in the presidential election of 1916 because women
had shared in the election. The election passed and
no question of throwinJ:!' out the vote of the women
or the State has even been proposed. The prompt
passage of a presidential woman suffrage bill bv the
legislatures of North Dakota and Ohio is an indication of the changed attitude of public sentiment toward this form of suffrage for women and is unquestionably the beginning of a movement which will
end only when the law has been passed by all State
lej:!'islatures.
The Constitution of the United States provides:
Article II, Section I. II-Each State shall appoint
in such manner as the legislatttre thereof mav direct.
a number of electors, equal to the whole number of
Senators and Representatives to which the State may
be entitled in the Congress . . . ,
The source of this power of the State legislatur!'s
beinl! the United States Constitution. the word "male"
defininl! the qualification of the usual electors of a
State does not preclude the vote for presidential electors being extended to women, for, according to Article VI, Section II-This Constitution ... shall be
the Supreme Law of the Land.

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SUFFRAGE WEEK AMONG THE
NEWSPAPERS



Plans for the gigantic, many-in-one special suffrage edition of newspapers are maturing rapidly
under the direction of the National American W oman Suffrage Association. Thanks to the interest and
good will of editors and newspaper proprietors, there
will be enough papers in line to plaster the country
west to the Rockies and south to the gulf with a
huge suffrage sheet. The week chosen for this
demonstration is February 19th-26th, though some
papers will not have their special editions until during the first week of March. Four pages of suffrage
features have been prepared by the "National" for
the use of plate-usmg papers and various special
features are at the command of the large dailies that
are to give special space to suffrage during February
and March. Among the dailies as now listed are the
Baltimore American, the Detroit Journal, the Providence, R. I., Journal, the St. Paul Daily News, the
Minneapolis Daily News, the Duluth Herald, the
Nashville Tennessean, etc. Oklahoma newspapers are
pledging special support in view of the imminence of
suffrage as a campaign issue in that state. North
Dakota suffragists find editors very hospitable to the
idea of the special editions because of the great
suffrage victory just won in the state (presidential
suffrage). There will be sixty-five special suffrage
editions in this state during newspaper week. Minnesota will have about thirty, Michigan about twentyfive, New Jersey about sixty-eight; Tennessee hopes
to· have forty. Georgia, South Carolina, Nebraska,
Rhode Island, Maryland, Massachusetts, Indiana and
Missouri will have special editions. It would seem
from present indications that every section of the
country will be covered.

"Mister, are you going my way?"

(Lavery in the Cincinnati Pan)

HE WAS!

Ohio Women will vote for the next President

SUFFRAGE NEWS

Page 4

PRESIDENTIAL SUFFRAGE MAP FOR 1917.

MONT.

]

"THE ILLINOIS LAW"

[

Now that presidential suffrage is a popular political
issue, there is a constant swirl of interest about "the
Illinois law." As the first state to put a presidential
suffrage bill into effect, Illinois has given its name to
this highly potential measure.
The full text of the Illinois law is given below. It
specifies the offices for which women are empowered
to vote under it.
(Senate Bill No. 63. Approved June 26, 1913.)
AN ACT granting women the right to vote for presidential
electors and certain other officers, and to participate and
vote in certain matters and elections.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the peopl e of the State of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly: That all women
citizens of the United States, above the age of 21 years, ha ving resided in the state one year, in the county ninety day s,
and in the election district thirty days next preceding any
election therein, shall be allowed to vote at such election for
presidential electors, member of the State Board of Equalization, clerk of the Appellate Court, county collector, county
surveyor, members of Board of Assessors, members of Board
of Review, sanitary district trustee, and for all officers of
cities, villages and towns (except police magistrates), and
upon all questions or propositions submitted to a vote of th e
electors of such municipalities or other political divisions of
this state.
Section 2. All such women. may also vote for the follow ing township officers: supervisors, town clerk, assessor, collector and highway commissioner, and may also participate
and vote in all annual and special town meetings in the town ship in which such election district shall be.
Section 3. Separate ballot boxes and ballots shall be provided ·for women, which ballots shall contain the names of
the candidates for such offices which are to be voted for and
the special questions submitted as aforesaid, and the ballots
cast by women shall be canvassed with the other ballots cast
for such officers and on such questions. At any such election
where registration is required, women shall register in the
same manner as male voters.

PRESIDENTIAL SUFFRAGE TALLY
BY STATES
~----------------------------------\.
There are nine states in which a presidential suffrage bill is now pending. They are : Indiana, Connecticut, Minnesota, Missouri, Rhode Island, New
Hampshire, Nebraska, New J ersey and Tennessee. In
six Southern states suffragists have taken the initial
steps toward presenting presidential suffrage bills.
These states are : Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Mississippi, Florida and Arkansas ; Wisconsin also may have a presidential suffrage bill introduced. Arkansas and Texas have bills pending giving
women the unique right to vote in the primaries.
(

Mrs.
Catherine Waugh
McCulloch

who drafted the
Illinois Suffrage
Bill.
(She is the mother
of four sons.)

~

NiA T I 0 NlA L S U F FIR A G E NaB W S

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THE BRIEF FOR PRESIDENTIAL SUFFRAGE

OPINION OF JUDGE HIRAM LT. GILBERT, OF THE
ILLINOIS BAR

Clause second of Section 1 of Article II of the Constitution of the United States provides as follows:
"Second. Each State shall appoint, in such manner
as the legislature thereof may direct, a number of
electors equal to the whole number of senators and
representatives to which the State may be entitled in
the Congre~s; but no senator or representative, or
· person holdmg an office of trust or profit under the
United States, shall be appointed an elector."
Presidential electors perform only duties pertaining
t~ the government of the United States. They are provtded for, not by a State law, but by a United States
law, to wit, the Constitution of the United States.
Therefore, in providing for the appointment of presidential electors, the legislature of the State does not
act under the authority and constitution of that State,
but solely under the authority of the Constitution of the
United States; and the latter instrument has placed the
matter of appointing presidential electors in the hands
of the State legislature and has given the latter full
discretionary power with respect thereto.
It. would be w~thin .the power of the legislature to
provide that prestdenttal electors should be appointed
by a vote of a majority of its own members, or it
could delegate the power of appointment to any class
of persons whom it might see fit to select for that
purpose. In fact, its power is plenary. For this reason, it is very clear that it has power to provide that
presidential electors shall be appointed by means of a
majority or plurality vote of such residents of the
State, whether male or female, as it may designate for
that purpose.
The only bearing the State constitution might have
up?n the q~testion would be with respect to those provisions which regulate the manner and form of legislative acts. So long as the provisions of those sections are complied with, no valid objection can be .
taken to any act of the legislature regulating the appointment of presidential electors.
ABSTRACT OF AN OPINION BY MR. CHARLES LEROY
BROWN OF THE CHICAGO BAR

In a review of judicial decisions and pertinent facts,
Mr. Charles LeRoy Brown, of the Chicago Bar, shows
the history and practical construction of that clause
of the Constitution that bears on the right of State
legislators to determine the manner of appointing presidential electors, and from the showing he argues that
"if the source of the power of the State legislature
to establish qualifications of voters is exclusively in
the Constitution of the United States, then no provision in a State constitution with respect to suffrage
has any bearing and a legislature is unhampered
thereby. The second clause of the first section of
Article II of the Constitution of the United States is
as follows :
"Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the
legislature thereof may di1·ect, a number of electors,
equal to the whole number of senators and representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress ; but no senator or representative, or person
holding an office of trust or profit under the United
States, shall be appointed an elector."

In an historic case which came to the United States
Suprem.e Cour~ from the State of Michigan in 1891,
Mr. Chtef Justice Fuller delivered an opinion that was
concu~red in by all the other members of the Court.
He satd:
"The Constitution does not provide that the appointment of electors shall be by popular vote, nor that the
electors shal~ b~ voted for upon a general ticket, nor
that the maJonty of those who exercise the elective
franchise can alone choose the electors. It recognizes
that the people act through their representatives in the
legislature, and leaves it to the legislature exclusively
to define the method of effecting the object."
Mr. Brown goes on to. say that the early operations
under the Federal Constitution make it plain that the
State legislatures were universally regarded as having
complete power to select presidential electors in any
manner they saw fit. Various modes of choosing the
~l~ctors were pursued, as by the legislature itself on
JOtnt ballot; by the legislature through a concurrent
vote of t~e two houses; by a vote of the people for a
gen~ral ticket; by a vote of the people in districts; by
chotce, partly by the people voting in districts and
partly by the le~islature ; and by choice of the legislatu.re from candidates voted for by the people in distncts.
Mr. Brown sums up as follows:
"The people in adopting the Federal Constitution
took away from the States, as such, all control over
the manner of appointment of presidential electors.
They provided that the electors shall be appointed in
such manner as the legislature may direct. The
words, 'In such manner as the legislature thereof may
direct,' have been held by the Supreme Court of the
United States to be a limitation upon the power of the
States. As those words are a limitation upon the
power of the States, nothing in any State constitution
can divest the legislature of the power to determine at
any time the manner of selecting presidential electors.
In so far as provisions of a State constitution attempt
to limit the right of suffrage to men in voting for
presidential electors, such provisions of a State constitution are void.
"The legislature of each State has supreme and
plenary power over the manner in which electors shall
be chosen. That power necessarily includes the right
to prescribe the qualifications of voters when the appointment of presidential electors is ordered by the
legislature to be effected by a popular election. Any
State legislature may itself retain that right of appointment or it may give it to all of its citizens, women as
well as men, regardless of any provisions in the State
constitution."

WOMEN HAVE llO ELECTORAL VOTES
(Fourteen States)
Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
California ...... ... . 13
Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Idaho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Illinois ... . ..... . ... 29
Kansas .. .. .. .. . .. .. 10
Montana . . ......... 4
Nevada .... . ....... 3

North Dakota .. . . . . . 5
Ohio ............... 24
Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Washington . . . . . . . . 7
Wyoming .. .. .. .. .. 3

120

NAT I 0 N A L S U F F R A G~E N E W S

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MISS ANTHONY'S BIRTHDAY

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. d i l l - - - - - By Anna Howard Shaw - - - - - .

The month of February always brings to the
thoughts of older suffragists one name and one annual
event-the gathering at Washington in National
Convention during the week of February 15th-Miss
Anthony's birthday, on which day funds were subscribed for carrying on the two principal lines of
work-the Federal Amendment to the national constitution and propaganda and state campaigns.
The name of Susan B. Anthony is synonymous with
the Federal Amendment, which was introduced in
the Senate through her efforts by Senator A. A.
Sargent of California, January 10, 1878, and has been
persistently and constantly urged by the National
Association in every Congress since. Though Miss
Anthony's name will always be linked with this
amendment, it is but one of the many lines along
which she traversed, all tending toward the same goal
-the full enfranchisement of women citizens of the
United States.
One of the characteristics of Miss Anthony was her
far-sighted and clear vision by which she discerned
that, though the goal was one and unchangeable, there
were many paths which led toward it, all of which,
like the branching streams that swell the water of a
mighty river, increasing its force, are helpful in determining 'its power.
So, while many different
methods of work were employed, they all tended toward the final recognition by the National Government of the political equality of all its citizens.
Miss Anthony's genius of initiative was remarkable,
and no event or opportunity, however trivial, which

could focu s attention upon the cause of woman suffrage, was allowed to pass unnoticed.
Once, at a convention held in Omaha, Nebraska,
the discussion was upon the medical service of the
Army during the Spanish War, and the lack of intelligent treatment and adequate preparation for the
care of sick soldiers. Miss Anthony made a thrilling speech, pointing out the need of women not only
as nurses, but women who could use their experience
as housekeepers and caretakers of the family 'in arranging for its comfort and by right of this knowledge could prepare for the comfort of the ill and
prevent the vast amount of unnecessary sickness
among the men.

Boys and Bugs
One woman, a strong partisan, thinking the criticism
reflected upon the Republican administration, interrupted Miss Anthony by exclaiming: "Dr. S--, at
the head of the Medical Department, is one of the
greatest bacteriologists of our time." Miss Anthony replied: "That may be; he may know all there is known
about bugs, but he does not know anything about the
care of boys." The lady turned to me in great anger,
saying: "Miss Anthony will find a suffrage argument
in anything." " Yes," I replied, "even in the red tape
and prejudice which allow brave young men to die,
rathoc than recognize the value of woman's knowledge and experience. That is why people who profit
by ·ignorance, cowardice and self-seeking fear her."

The Crime of Voting
The single incideqt in her life, which is strangely
little known even to suffragists, but which was of
the most vital importance in its results, shows her

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NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS

Page 7

ability not alone to seize every opportunity to push
woman's cause, but her willingness to sacrifice and
suffer for it. This is the incident of her voting at
the general election in 1872 and her arrest trial and
sentence by the Federal Court. This, as ~ith every
act of Miss Anthony's life, was not an act of bravado;
she believed the 14th Amendment of the National
Constitution recognized that women citizens as well
as negro men were entitled to the full rights of
citizenship, an opinion still held by many suffragists.
The only way to settle the question was to bring a
case to the courts, and she offered herself as the sacrifice.

By Way of Thanksgiving
On Thanksgiving, a very appropriate day for such
a purpose, when, by the proclamation of the nation's
chief executive, the people assembled at their various
places of worship to give thanks for freedom, justice
and equality, a warrant was served upon Miss Anthony, and she, an American citizen, was arrested for
the crime of voting.
The officer conducted her to the court house in
a street car, but, evidently disturbed at the situation,
knowing Miss Anthony was greatly beloved in her
own community, seated himself in the car as far away
from her as possible. vVben the conductor demanded
her fare, she said: "Oh! That gentleman is conducting me to court; I am a prisoner and am riding at the
expense of the National Government-ask him for my
carfare."
·
Miss Anthony was tried, found guilty and sentenced to one month's imprisonment or to pay a fine
of one hundred dollars. When asked by the judge
if she had anything to say, her words revealed her
sterling honesty, her indomitable courage, her unflinching purpose, and she ended her remarks by holding her hand aloft and declaring: "I will never pay
one C€nt of your unjust penalty, and I shall earnestly
and persistently continue to urge all women to the
practical recognition of the old Revolutionary maxim
that 'Resistance to tyranny is obedience to God.' "
Fearing the result if Miss Anthony were imprisoned,
the judge hastily remarked: "Madam, the Court will
not order your commitment until the fine is paid."
No suffragist should fail during the month of February, or on Miss Anthony's birthday, to read the full
account of this trial and the unexcelled address delivered by her, in every school district in the country.
This trial, and scores of other occasions when Miss
A,nthony stood almost alone in her struggle for women's freedom, makes February 15th a sacred day to
suffragists throughout the world.

For Humanity
Other leaders whose birthday occurs in this month
were supported by public sentiment and popular applause. George Washington led an armed force of
men of indomitable courage and fierce determination
who rallied about him. The whole world recognized
the right of men to fight for their principles, be they
what they might. Abraham Lincoln was backed by a
nation of patriotic citizens and a vast army of men
in his magnificent struggle. to preserve the Union ;
but Susan B. Anthony, in the beginning, and for
years, was the butt of misunderstanding, misstatement and ridicule, with all the prejudice and ignorance
of ancient custom, with both church and state against
her. But with unflinching fortitude and consecrated
purpose she never faltered from the stt:aight line of
service and sacrifice which led to the ~oal of freedom
-not for a sex, nor for a race, but for humanity.

SANDS AT SEVENTY
.

Who that saw her does not remember the spirited
figure, gay with the immortal gayety of the ever young
at heart, trudging up Fifth Avenue, carrying the palm
of victory in that mighty suffrage parade of 1915!
Now she is telling us that she is seventy years old.
And we are not believing her. Yet, after all, seventy
years is a short time in which to have amassed the
wealth of esteem, love and reverence that are hers.
Among the many messages of congratulation that she
received during February was one from President Wilson, which said:
MY DEAR DOCTOR SHAW:

May I not wish you for your seventieth birthday not only
a return to strong health, but the happy anticipation of many
more years of useful service? You certainly have many years
of self-sacrificing work to look back upon with pride and satisfaction, and I want to join with your other fnends in wishin&" you many returns of your birthday and an increasing
happiness as they come. Cor d'tally and smcerely
·
yours,
WooDROW WILSON.

When Dr. Shaw began her fight for woman suffrage
nearly a half century ago there were only a few small
voices to support her. Last year suffrage was the
dominant element in a national election. Fifty years
ago equal suffrage was an academic theory. It is now
a fact in fourteen states.

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NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS

THE SUFFRAGE SCHOOL

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THE LESLIE WOMAN SUFFRAGE
COMMISSION

II

One of the activities of the National American
Woman Suffrage Association that is commending itself
highly to conservative people is the chain of suffrage
schools that are interlocking the country.
Concerning the work of the suffrage school in the
South, one southern newspaper, the Raleigh News and
Observer, has been moved to say :
"We believe in the value of systematic organization. 'vVe know of no army that could ever
hope to obtain victory which was not organized
and directed. That political party which goes into
the field of contest without any plan of campaign
is pretty apt to be driven to the wall.
"So we think that wisdom is being shown by
the advocates of 'votes for women' in their program of giving instruction in the matter of equal
suffrage to those who are seeking to obtain the
ballot. That such instruction is given the name of
a suffrage school is only as a matter of distinction,
all that is sought being to give to the suffragists
the arguments held to be needed and instruct them
in the plans for securing the approval of the
people for their cause.
"This morning there begins in Raleigh a suffrage
school. We believe that the instruction given at it
will be of value not alone to the women, but likewise to the State. It might as well be recognized
by the opponents of woman suffrage that we are
in the midst of a thinking age, and that women
are taking steps to put their arguments before
Legislatures and the voters in the best form shows
their wisdom. Indeed it shows that they know the
worth of the ballot, and are equipping themselves
to secure that right for which men have yielded up
their lives.
"Vve commend the suffrage leaders in the program of study and preparation and organization
which they have arranged. And we believe that
the results will fully justify all the effort that they
have put into this plan of campaign for the ballot."
Among the instructors who have been sent out by
the "National" are Mrs. Frank Shuler, of Buffalo,
Mrs. Halsey W. Wilson, of New York, Mrs. T. T.
Cotnam, of Arkansas, and Miss Anne Doughty, of
Manhattan.

THE CARDINAL AND THE SUFFRAGISTS
Cardinal Gibbons, who has long been actively opposed to woman suffrage, was recently waited on by
a delegation of such representative Catholic women
as Mrs. William Prendergast, wife of the Controller
of New York; Miss Janet Richards, the lecturer, and
Miss Sarah McPike, President of the St. Catherine
Welfare Association, of New York. His Eminence
said that it was hard for an old man to change his
mind, but that he was open to conviction and would
give the subject earnest thought.
Cardinal Gibbons's opposition to suffrage is about
the only argument left the antis. If he forsakes their
campaign, they will be bereft indeed. A large number of devout Catholic women and many eminent
Catholic divines are ardent suffragists and they are
diligently furthering the suffrage cause with such dignitaries of the Church as remain unpersuaded.

Under a recent court ruling, an order of distribution of a portion of the Leslie fortune, left to Mrs.
Catt for use in suffrage work, has been issued. This
does not mean, however, that the bulk of the Leslie
fund has been released, such release being contingent
upon the many delays incident to court procedure.
A corporation, to be called the Leslie Woman Suffrage Commission, has been established under the law
of the State of New York. Mrs. Jean Norris, Attorney, had the matter in hand. Mrs. Leslie's will
made the following provisions:
"All the rest, residue and remainder of my
estate, whatsoever and wheresoever situate whereof I may be seized or possessed, or to which I
may be in any manner entitled at the time of my
death, including the amount of any legacies hereinbefore given which may for any reason lapse
or fail, I do give, devise and bequeath unto my
friend Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, of the City
of New York. (It is my expectation and wish
that she turn all of my said residuary estate
into cash, and apply the whole thereof as she
shall think most advisable to the furtherance
of the cause of 'vVoman Suffrage to which she
has so worthily devoted so many years of her life,
and that she shall make suitable provision, so
that in case of her death any balance thereof remaining unexpended may be applied and expended in the same way; but this expression of
my wish and expectation is not to be taken as
creating any trust or as limiting or affecting the
character of the gift to her, which I intend to be
absolute and unrestricted.")
Mrs. Catt will turn over to the Commission the administration of the fund and share with other members of the corporation the responsibility of making
plans for the disbursements and carrying them into
effect. There are five incorporators who by vete
will add to the membership of the Commission until
it numbers fifteen. These incorporators are: Carrie Chapman Catt, New York; Alice Stone Blackwell,
Massachusetts; Harriet Taylor Upton, Ohio; Mrs.
Winston Churchill, New Hampshire; Mrs. Raymond
Robins, Illinois.
The Commission will establish a National Bureau
of Suffrage Education as its chief work. The
methods employed for the development of this Bureau and other lines of work will be determined at
the first meeting of the Commission.
Campaigns within States will continue to be conducted by the State suffrage associations, and the
Federal campaign will continue to be conducted by
the National American Woman Suffrage Association.
In other words, the Commission will not conflict with
the work of present organizations by attempting to
conduct campaigns, either national or state.
It will under no circumstances contribute to · the
overhead or necessary running expenses of the National or State Associations. If the money should be
used as a substitute for money which is now raised
and expended through the regular channels, the Leslie bequest would in no sense aid the cause.
Any contributions which it may make to National
or State campaigns will be in the form of rewards for
having
othec
'"m' foe the "me PU'PO"·

'"'"d Y"d
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NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS

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Page9

WOMEN CALLED TO THE COLORS-1914-1917

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - B y Mary Sumner Boyd - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - L

"The determination of State policy and the making
of !aw should be left to that part of the community
whtch may be called upon to support the policy or to
enforce the law with arms."-MoNROE SMITH.
Since the outbreak of the European War we have
not had to go back to Boadicea to find the woman
war~i<:>r, nor do we single out a peculiar and unfemmme type when we name the women warriors
about whom the press despatches tell.
It was or.dinary women who fought by their own
doorsteps wtth any weapon they could lay their hands
upon in the streets of Liege in Belgium and of Mulhausen in Alsace, in August, 1914. We never shall
know how many other women fought in other towns
to repel the invader, but out of the thousands who
have fought come the names of a few of those actually
enlisted in the ranks.
Mercy Ivanovna, who received the cross of St.
George, died in storming the enemy's position at the
head of a Russian Company ; Alexandra Bashkireva
who received a medal of the same order, and Sophi~
Ivanovitch are other Russian soldiers whose names
we know.
Three anonymous Russian girls quietly took their
places in the ranks until wounded and their sex was
found out; another escaped from the hospital and
re-enlisted. A Russian husband and wife fought side
by side, and a daughter followed her father who had
been killed in battle. Seven German women in uniform were found among the captured wounded in a
hospital in Petrograd. Mlles. Dutrieu and Marvingt
and Mrs. Buller are among the allies' aviators.
In August, 1916, Emilienne Moreau, a Normal
student of 17, confronted in her own town of Loos
in Northern France by siege and occupation, nursed
the wounded in her own house, went out under fire to
get wood for her dead father's coffin and won French
and English medals for courage on the field of battle.
The story of Edith Cavell does not need to be told.
From her death one anti-suffragist at least got light.
"We know now that there are thousands of such
women. A year ago we did not know that they existed," said Lord Asquith.
Three women are named among the military architects of Germany, and in like manner, in work essential
to the carrying on of the war, women were employed
in the garrison of the 36th Infantry at Calu, and the
French Minister of War issued a circular early in
1916 to all military officials instructing them to employ women as often as they could instead of men.
Women in great numbers have worked in the military
campaigns in every helpful capacity besides fighting.
French women in the occupied territory have held
up the courage of their fellow townsmen and organized them to take up life again after a siege. When
the · mayor of devastated and . occupied Guillemont
broke down under the strain his wife took over the
duties of his office. Mme. Cheron, a teacher, took
charge in Buffignereux during a bombardment.
Mme. Macherez, a citizen of Soissons, on the approach of the Germans took over the duties of the
sick mayor, managed the hospital and carried the
town through a bombardment. Mme. Fiquemont is
another who became deputy mayor in a town besieged.

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"Nameless heroism," says one despatch, "is displayed by the women every day." These women did
not set out to be heroes or to exercise masculine
virtues; they simply did the work which the exigencies
of war thrust upon them.
One woman stands out for her courage in the defence of her own sex. We hear of a Mme. F-- in
the despatches-her town is not named-who hastened
the youn~ girls <?ut before the approaching enemy
and remamed. behmd, herself, to explain to the German general JUSt what peril-a peril peculiar to all
women and to women in all wars-she wanted to save
them from.
Between those who fought and those who maintained the institutions of peace during bombardment
and occupation stand those women, the largest body
of women on the field of battle in this war who
went upon the field to save life.
'
I_'irst of these should be recorded the peasant girl
Jalma, whom we are told of in a single line in the
new~papers, who went amc;mg the wounded under fire
to gtve water to those dymg on both sides.
When the war began strangers who were in German:y saw a r~markable sight. They saw the whole
nursmg force m the German hospitals which are all
organized in the Red Cross, sent to the field or to
the base hospitals for the wounded. In the hospitals
for the sick were left only a few midwives and some
nurses in training.
In this war Dr. Crile* tells us that the field haspitals are for the most part within range of the guns
and nurses and doctors are sometimes shot down at
their work. Schwester Marga Von Falkenhausen
struck by a bomb in the hospital at Sissone, was th~
first of many German nursing sisters killed or
wounded. Schwester Elfriede Scherhaus was the first
to receive the Iron Cross.
~n March, 1916, the French Academy awarded its
pn~es, and this year th~ recipient organizations were
mamly those engaged m war work. The most important was the Red Cross and the award makes
special mention of many women. Among them are
Mme. Fontaine, Mlle. Crosse and five Sisters of
Mercy killed. The award quotes a hundred army
orders referring to women. Of the Comtesse de
Gormas and Mme. Gay Lussac one order says: "These
ladies remained at their post with the same valor as
soldiers in the firing line." Mme. Gay Lussac died
from nursing infectious cases. Six nurses of the
Societe de Secours carried away the wounded under
bombardment. Of Mlle. Germaine Sellier and Mlle.
Sivon the surgeon general says : "They showed a most
magnificent example of military courage."
Nursing sisters of the Holy Saviour, St. Vincent
de Paul, and many other orders are found everywhere
on the field and in the base hospitals. Nursing sister St. Pierre was wounded at her post. Marie Messin was shot tending soldiers. Sister Bertine conducted an ambulance during the bombardment of
Arras. The Nurses of Noyon remained at their posts
during bombardment.
Mlle. Marie Rosnet, superior of the hospital at
Clermont en Argonne, remained in her village after
*G. W . Crile, Mechani stic Theory of War and Peace.

Page 10

NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS

occupation and prevented the Burning of the town.
Sister Sainte Susanne of Arras and Mlle. Marie
Gilles were both killed by shells at their post of duty.
At Luneville another nurse was killed in the same
way. Mme. Gouin of Rheims is one of many nurses
in many towns who transported the wounded to cellars when the hospitals were under bombardment.
Mlle. Eugenie Antoine of Vailly sur Aisne was decorated by the English . for her .care of the wounded
under fire. Mlles. Cuny, Bertrand and Marie Pierron
nursed under fire, the latter making it her task to go
out into the woods and search for the wounded.
The work of French school teachers comes in for
mention again and again. Miles. Fouriaux, Lanthiez
Cavorrot and Mme. Fiquemont of Rheims were reported to the French Minister of Education for gallant condnct. Another school mi stress turned her

MISS HENDERSON OF THE ROUMANIAN UNIT

school into a lazarette. Mlle. Marcelle Semmer, also
a teacher, received the Cross of the Legion of Honor.
The Nurses of St. Charles at Nancy had to their
credit at the beginning of 1916 over a thousand soldiers nursed under heavy fire. Their superior Sister
Julie was given the Cross of the Legion of Honor.
This is a partial list of those mentioned in army
orders and in despatches from France. Every day
adds to the number, and for one mentioned there are
a hundred as anonymous as the soldier in the ranks.
This is a war in which the operations are so scattered, the numbers so vast, that we know little or
nothing of the exploits of individual men and women.
But we do know that the part taken by their women
has been the wonder of the nations at war.
"The Crimean War," says an article in the Common Cause, organ of the National Union of Woman

Suffrage Societies, "created the war nurse. This war
has created the woman war doctor."
The woman war doctor is the peculiar contribution
of England. The history of English women on the
field in thi s war has been of hospitals staffed from
the head of the medical staff to the lowest orderly by
women. There have been literally thousands of these
women. Of nurses alone 10,000 are spoken of at
one time and there is no public record of how many
there have been since. Besides the staffing of the
hospitals women have gone out as cooks and to work
in other capacities in the camps. In the list of almost
5,000 persons named by Sir Douglas Haig last summer for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field
are many women, and in recognition of their numbers
the King ordered that in future the military medal
be given to women.
Like the French and German nurses the English
nurses and doctors were killed at the post of duty.
Nurses in hospital ships torpedoed by the enemy responded gallantly to the order "Women first" by
claiming their privilege and duty of seeing the sick
and wounded taken off first, and so, many nurses lost
their lives.
To men in the hospital service military titles are
given. For the most part the women doing the same
work do not have this recognition, though a few do
bear the title of Colonel or Captain. The titles were
g rudgingly given, and indeed the services of the women were grudgingly accepted at first by the British
war office . It was not till the French accepted the
English women's hospital units that the English authorities learned th eir value.
At the beginning of the war the Scottish branch of
the National Union of Woman Suffrage Societies set
about raising funds for hospitals. A district teacher
gave £10 from her savings. This was the first donation; since then thou sands of pounds have flowed in.
The first hospital went to Calais under Dr. Alice
Hutchinson and Dr. Mary Phillips. Dr. Hutchinson
served in the Balkan War a few years ago and her
experience made hers the model for other women's
units which were established at the request of the
French military authorities at Royaumont, Troye and
other places. The fine Royaumont hospital had as
its medical chief, Dr. Frances Ivens, and Mrs. Harley,
sister of Sir John French, as administrator. Mrs.
Harley is one of many who have received the French
Croix de Guerre. She had charge of the transport
column, one o( whose duties was to pick up the
wounded on the field.
The Woman's Hospital Corps is another English
enterprise. This group first began work under the
French Red Cross in Paris.
Early in 1915 the English military authorities awoke
to the value of these medical women and their equipment, so eagerly made use of by the French. They
made them a part of the British Medical Service and
put Dr. Louisa Garrett Anderson in charge of a large
hospital at Boulogne. Subsequently a base hospital
at Endell Street, London, became one of the Scottish
Women's Hospitals. Of Dr. Anderson's hospital, a
medical official said: "You have set a standard which
is quite unknown even among the auxiliary hospitals."
In most of these hospitals the whole staff, housekeeping, ward service, business and medical, are women. Among the doctors in this group is one of the
few women bearing a military title, Captain Everett.
McClaren, of the 3d Scottish Military Hospital.

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NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS

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In December, 1915, the first beginning of what is
known as the Millicent Fawcett Hospitals was made.
Two women were sent out to Petrograd to take care
of maternity cases among refugees in Russia. From
the care of these poor mothers the work spread to
cover many other cases. There are now, under Drs.
May, King-Atkinson and other women, 5 hospitals
from Petrograd to Kazan, and from Kazan to Galicia.
They include an infectious hospital for children and
another for soldiers at Volhynia in Galicia. In the
latter place the doctors ferreted out concealed cases
of smallpox and prevented an epidemic.
One enterprise of the Scottish Women's hospitals
group which has been surrounded by danger at every
step has been their work with the Serbians. The
first of their Serbian Units was sent out by the French
military authorities at the end of 1914 under Dr.
Eleanor Soltau, to take care of surgical cases at
Kragujevatz. Let the Common Cause tell this part
of the story:
"The Unit found, on its arrival, that it had a far
more serious work before it, for the typhus epidemic,
which had begun in the disgracefully dirty and overcrowded hospitals left behind them by the Austrians,
flowed over Serbia like a flood. No one will ever
know what the mortality was from that terrible outbreak, but this we know, that more than a quarter
of the Serbian doctors died, and two-thirds of the
remainder had the disease, a fact which speaks volumes for the devotion of the Serbian medical profession , and is some indication of what the ravages
must have been among the general population. T o
Dr. Soltau's everlasting credit, she took over, with her
small staff and, for such an increase of work, her inadequate equipment, No. 6 Reserve Hospital for typhus cases and No. 7 Reserve Hospital for ordinary
medical cases, in addition to her surgical hospital,
which was full. The Committee hurried out reinforcements and equipment. For three long months
those women worked there, facing the hard work and
the long strain with indomitable spirit. There were
three deaths among the Unit, young lives given in a
great cause, and nine cases of illness, and still the
effort never relaxed.
"The British Government sent out a Commission
under Colonel Hunter, which did invaluable sanitary
work outside the hospitals. There was also a French
Commission, and an American one which came out
with all the wealth of the Rockefeller Institute at its
back. Other units-French, Russian, American and
British-took their share of the work-notably Lady
Paget:s Unit under the Serbian Relief Committeeand at last, by May, the epidemic was over.
"It is a strange, dark, gruesome time to look back
on; but one marked by many brave deeds and much
unrecorded heroism. It will always be a proud fact
in the story of the Scottish Women's Hospital that
we took our share, too, in that great battle. At the
end of the time Dr. Soltau herself fell ill with diph ··
theria and was invalided home. After that the Fever
Unit, which had had .charge of the typhus cases, was
sent to Mladanovitz to open camp hospital behind the
Second Arm."
The hospitals remained until the invasion of Serbia.
"There is no space to tell of the horrors of the retreat," says the Common Cause. "One hospital after
another was evacuated, a field ambulance was formed
in conjunction with the Serbians, called the Second
Serbo-English Fi~ld Ambulance, Dr. Chesney and Dr.

Page 11

Laird, the British Medical Officers. This field ambulance trekked over half Serbia during the retreat, always trying to form hospitals, always arriving to find
the town they came to evacuated. The hospitals all
came down to the West Morava Valley, bringing in
every case their full equipment with them, not to any
great purpose, for eventually it was all seized by the
Germans. Dr. MacGregor managed to put in a fortnight's excellent work at Kragujevatz, where she
opened a hospital of 600 beds in the artillery barracks
and a big dressing-station, 1,000 cases a week passing
through her hands."
Part of the staff of this hospital remained behind
at its work, in two parties, one of which, under Dr.
H utchinson, was taken prisoner.
"The last Unit, caught at Salonique, and unable
to advance into Serbia, took up the work at that end,
and under Dr. Mary Blair, cared for the train-loads of
refugees escaping southward, passed them on to the
ships, and eventually arrived with some 5,000 of them
in Corsica, where they have opened a general hospital,

DR. ELSIE INGLIS

an infectious diseases hospital, where they are doing
all the medical work, supervising the sanitation and
supplying medical aid to the Serbians in all the villages. Their work not only bears fruit now, but means
great things in the future."
In August, 1916, Dr. Elsie Inglis went out with the
newest enterprise, to the Roumanian front at Dobrudia. They had to retreat almost immediately, but
in the very act of evacuating the doctors treated over
2,000 wounded. The hospital staff was the last group
to leave and they passed through burning villages with
bombs bursting around them. In this retreat the transport column of eight ambulances, kitcl;ten and supply
and repair cars, which is part of the equipment of
every Unit, was invaluable.
Miss Henderson, the administrator of the Roumanian Unit, commented on the women's indifference to
danger.
"We had German reroplanes over our camps," says
she, "but our girls showed the utmost disregard of
danger. I heard one girl orderly, lying on her back
so as to get a better view of one, say quite calmly: 'It
looks exactly as if the bomb might fall into my mouth
if he dropped it.'"

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WOMEN VOTERS AND ELECTION EXPENSES

If argument were made to-day to exclude any
group of male citizens from the electorate, on the
ground that their admission would increase the cost
of election expenses, the proponents would be consigned to ignominous oblivion without a day's delay.
Yet anti-suffragists officially make appeal to this most
mercenary and anti-democratic of motives as grounds
for denying votes to women. Not only do they do
this, they adduce figures that warp the facts almost
beyond recognition. For instance, the cost of election
expense in a "little election" year-no gubernatorial
vote--is compared invidiously with the cost of a "big
election" year, when a whole national and state
ticket is in the field. They take a year like 1913which, for reasons unknown to gods and men, was an
off-year in election annals in Illinois, a phenomenally
small proportion of voters going to the polls-and
compare its election expense, more or less vaguely,
with the election expenses of 1916. Women were not
voters in 1913. They were in 1916. The horizon
must be made to gloom and glower during the interim.
"In Chicago the cost of election has increased three
times as a result of adding women to the electorate."
It takes an anti to make the connection. The clerk
of Cook County can't do it. He says that adding
women to the electorate has added one-third to the
election expenses. In this connection it is of interest
to note that the cost per registered voter in New
York, where women don't vote-yet-was, in 1914,
2.29; in Chicago, where women do vote, it was 1.84.
In 1915, the cost per voter in St. Louis, where women don't vote, was 2.12; in Chicago that year it was
1.095. That is to say, in 1914 at a cost of one and
one-half million, one-sixth of the population of New
York voted. In the same year at a cost of one and
one-sixth million, seven-twelfths of the population of
Chicago voted.
Again, anti-suffragists pick a fastidious way among
facts, eliminating all those that don't prove what they
want proved with a dexterity that is fairly violent.
For instance, by selecting state and county "governmental cost payments" as a basis for calculation, they
are able to show that the cost of government in a
group of non-suffrage states, New York, New Jersey
and Pennsylvania, is less than in a group of suffrage
states, California, Oregon and Washington. What
that means is that the big item of governmental
cost payments-the expenditures of incorporated
places-is lifted out of anti-suffrage consideration
quietly but surely. New York, New Jersey and
Pennsylvania are full of incorporated places-the
"city States" of the east. Ad their cost payments to
the state and county cost payments and the total goes
sky-rocketing far beyond the ken of California, Washington and Oregon. Take just one example-New
York's State and County expense is only about
$85,700,000. The incorporated places' expense is
$306,000,000!
The subjoined table institutes a comparison of the
cost of elections that is illumining.

COST OF ELECTIONS IN VARIOUS YEARS IN CHICAGO
(From Board of Election Commissioner's R ep ort-I9IS)

1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915

Cost
$617,854.89
443,781.27
604,998.22
476,326.64
618,827.63
519,573.18
908,015.98
404,276.74
1,136,976.76
785,069.00

Per Vote
.70
.74

.660

.83
.74
.56
.79
.97
.79
.57

Per Capita
.31
.22
.29
.22
.28
.23
.40
.17
.47
.32

In 1906 there were 1,259 precincts; in 1915 there
were 1,587, which is an increase of only 328 and not
a "doubling" of precincts as the antis claim.
Note the high cost of the male election of 1912 and
its enormous per vote cost, because fewer voted in
that year than in any election since 1906. The year
1915, women voting, has the lowest per vote cost except 1911-one cent lower-and its per capita cost is
not high. Complete 1916 figures are not available.
It is easy to say, as the antis do, that "doubling the
electorate will double the election expenses." Easy to
say, but hard to prove.
Telegrams from the states that now enjoy the benefits of woman suffrage, with none of the disasters
attendant upon increased election expenses and increased taxes, are now on file at the headquarters of
the New · York State Woman Suffrage Party. In
every case the telegrams are signed either by the Gov. ernor ? r by the Secretary of State.
WYOMING: " Woman suffrage has not increased taxes
in this state nor cost of elections."
CoLORADO: "Only increase in cost of elections what
naturally accrues from added number of electorate."
IDAHO: "Added election expense infinitesimal."
W ASI-IINGTON : "Election expenses only increase by
slight cost caused by effort to keep voting precincts under 250 voters."
CALIFORNIA : "Increased cost of elections because of
women voters very little."
OREGON: "\Voman suffrage has increased election
expenses only so far as naturally they would
increase proportionately to increase in number
of voters."
ARIZONA: "Increased cost of elections through women voting not worth considering."
KANSAS: " Increased cost of elections insignificant."
NEVADA: "Slightly increased cost of printing additional ballots and compensation for election
clerks."
ILLINOIS: The city clerk from Springfield writes:
"The increase of election expenses thus far has
been nominal and due only to expense incident
to printing additional ballots and furnishing
extra booths."
MoNTANA: "The argnment of increased taxation because of woman suffrage is absurd."

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FINANCE

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. - - - B y Emma Winner Rogers, Treasurer - - - . J

Every State suffrage assoctattOn ts sp~c ially e~­
gaged just now in a money-raising campatgn, or m
planning for such a campaign. To do this efficiently
is of first importance. The National Treasurer has
suggested methods and plans for money-raising campaigns both through the NEws LETTER and in correspondence with State Treasurers and members of
the National Finance Committee, and must continually
remind these officials and all F inance Chairmen of even
smaller suffrage divisions that "Where there's a will
there's a way."
The determination to raise ample funds to carry
through either State or local suffrage plans is the first
essential. The selecting of finan cial chairmen deciding on suitable methods and the enthusiastic pressing
of financial campaigns will succeed in the measure
that determined purpose to accomplish these results
is present. vVise suggestions and efficient methods are
sure to be seized on by zealous State and local Finance
Chairmen to forward the interests of their treasuries.
The National Treasurer is sure that valuable help
will be found in the following quotations from the
forthcoming efficiency booklet on "How to Raise
Money for Suffrage," which the National Woman
Suffrage Publishing Co. now has in press, written by
Henrietta W . Livermore of New York. The booklet
will cover:
A Money-Raising Campaign, Budget and Pledges
and Suggestions for Money Raising.
We quote from the firs t of these three topics:
A.-MONEY-RAISING CAMPAIGN
"The Manager. Suffrage associations are looking
for the right kind of woman to be a financial campaign manager. . . . A woman suff ragist, tactful attractive, executive, accurate and optimistic is n~ces­
sary. Do you know her?
"The Committee. The Committee should begin
work at least two months before the campaign. The
entire success depends on the planning ahead and
thoroughness of work of thi s Committee and in the
selection of captains. At least six should serve on
this Finance Campaign Committee. Set the time for
beginning and end of the campaign and advertise it.
Select a slogan. Decide on the number of teams necessary, amount to be raised, amount you expect each
team to raise, the forms of pledges and the forms of
~eceip~s and all details . of the campaign.
Begin an
mtenstve hunt for the kmd of captains who will work
with a will and who can inspire others to work. Get
at least six capable captains.
"Scheme. Divide your territory into districts that
can be covered by a team. If your territory is a city,
wards and election districts are a natural division.
If other lines of division seem more advisable, such
as denominations, or fraternal organizations or school
districts, or social lines, let these be clearly mapped
out.
"Have the captain bring in names of the persons to
be asked for contributions in the territory to which
she is assigned. Have all the lists card-catalogued
both a general alphabetical one §or reference, and ~
dis~rict card catal~g of the ? afnes in the territory
asstgned each captam. Meanttm., each captain must

be selecting her team of six (more if possible) who
will give up the entire campaign week to the task.
"The Campaign. Six days should be devoted to
the campaign. On Monday have a get-together
luncheon, at which the manager, the committee, the
captains and teams are present. At separate tables
seat each captain with her team. Afte r the luncheon
the manager launches the campaign, explains all details and arou ses enthusiasm. Each table should be
labelled with the number of the team. The card catalogs for each team are then placed on each table, gone
over by th e team and the names assigned to individuals
of the team. Any especially important or difficult
names are taken by the manager. Full directions of
details of pledge-taking and money-receipting are explained and the necessary paraphernalia given to each
person. System and exactness are required. Each
member of a team keeps a record on her cards from
now on of persons seen or interviewed, together with
results. These cards are then fi led in the captain's
file. After luncheon and business are over the teams
separate to visit immediately the names assigned and
to meet at luncheon on the next clay to report results.
"Following Days. Each clay at luncheon teams report totals and turn in money received and these
amounts are credited to the teams on a large blackboard. A victor's banner is placed daily on the table
of the team reporting the largest sums obtained.
Let the teams talk over their names after each luncheon and discuss difficulties and plans, separating to
canvass as usual.
"Publicity. Clever advertising beforehand helps,
a taking slogan, or any local hit or appeal. Posters
are useful. Arouse curiosity beforehand and enthusiasm while the campaign is on.
"Whirlwind Campaign. The end of the campaign
may see any especial form of campaign, utilizing every
helper available, a 'dime' campaign, pencils sold on
the street, mite boxes, a tag day, or whatever best
suits the community. Here is the place fo r an original
stunt. Let the campaign close with a clash and a final
dinner or luncheon to which important guests are invited. If you have not reached the amount set, have
pledges taken at this final dinner. You will get the

amount."
ANTHONY APHORISMS

* *

*

''It rej oices me every time I find a competent

woman in a responsible position ."

* * *

"Degradation in the labor market always has been,
is today, and always will be the result of disfranchisement."

* * *

"The first duty of every intelligent woman is to
Jevote her best energies to getting the power of the
ballot into the hands of all women."

* * *

" I am here for a little time only, and then my place
will be filled as theirs was filled. The fight must not
cease. You must see that it does not stop."

A WORD OF REMINDER
Subscriptions to the NATIONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS are
very much in order. Subscription blanks will be
found in forthcoming numbers and those whose subscriptions are falling clue at this time are asked to
renew promptly.

NATI ONAL SUFFRAGE NEWS

Page H

FINANCE-CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED FROM JANUARY 1 TO 31, 1917

[

..1-------GENERAL

DONATIONS ~

Anne K . Chan,ing . .... $5.00
1.00
Mrs. Fra n cis Magoun ..
2.00
W . C. Gan nett .... ... .
Berrien Co. Eq. S. Assn. 1 5.3~
1.00
Mrs. Samuel Clay . ....
1.00
Miss Olivia Bowditch ..
1.00
Mrs. Charles E. Brown.
1.00
Mrs. Paul Bu tler...... .
1.00
Mrs. Eilzabetb Berry .. .
2.00
Mles Lucy Allen· · · · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. S. Bridgma n .... .
1.00
M re. H erbert Barton .. .
1.00
Miss ·r.rargnret Anthon y
1
.00
Mrs. Ellen 1'. Adams ...
1.00
Miss c. s. Callendar .. ·
1
.00
Mrs. Grace Bailey. · • · ·
1 .00
Miss Caroline Cook.· . · ·
1.00
Mrs. AJtred Bullard .. · ·
1 .00
Mrs. !<'red Ashworth . . .
1 .00
Miss Mary W are Allen . .
1.00
Mrs. ColematJ · · · · · · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. Charles B . Alden . .
1 .00
Mre. C. Eliot. ·· ·· · · ··· ·
1.00
Mrs. Charles P . Adams .
1.00
Isabel L. Briggs· · · · · · ·
1.00
Sa ra h B. Dabney .. ····
1 .00
Elizabeth Anthony · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. Wlllhtm Benedict .
Mrs. Langdon Frot hing·
1.00
bam .. ·· ·· ·· · ····· ···
1 .00
Mrs. Herbert Bond . · . · ·
1
.00
Mrs. c. M. Baker. · · · · ·
1 .00
Mies LibbY · · · · · · · · · · ·
1 .00
EmilY Caller · · · · · · · · · ·
1.00
M·rs. David Edsall. · · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. B ertha Brenner . ..
1.00
)!lTa Chandler . · · · • · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. Elizabeth H. Bowles
1.00
Mrs. Hilda B . Shaw · · · ·
1 .00
Miss Brooks · · · · · · · · · · ·
1.00
Charlotte Clapp · · · · · ·
1 .00
Belen Farnham · · · · · · ·
1.00
Harriet Ellis · · · · · · · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. w . T. Forbes.·.··
1.00
Miss Edith Burrage · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. c. F. Fearing . .. ·
2.00
Miss Abbie Barry· · · · · ·
1.00
Miss M)trY Barrow . . . ..
1.00
Miss Allee Chandler· · · ·
1 .00
1\frs. walte r Channing ..
1 .00
Miss Edith Fuller · · · · · ·
1.00
Mi ss Lucy Bardwell .. . ·
1.00
Mrs. M. E . Collins .· · · ·
1.00
Mrs. Henri et t a Aiken . . .
1.00
Miss Mary Aiken .. ··· ··
1.00
Mrs. c. A. Gray · · · · · · · ·
1.00
Miss Amy Woods . . .. ··
1.00
Miss Lillian Cram . · · · · ·
1.00
Miss E . v. Chenery ....
1 .00
Miss Charlotte Flint .· ·
1.00
Miss Elizabeth Flint.· · ·
1.00
Alia Foster .. · · · · · · · · · ·
1.00
Mise o. J . Dabner . . ... ·
1 .00
Mrs. K. W . Griswold . . ·
1.00
Miss F . Van Baalen . ...
1 .00
Florence W. Darol. · · · ·
1.00
Miss M. T. H ersey. · · · · ·
1 .00
Miss Allee Emerson .. . ·
1.00
Mrs. B . M. Lau~eblln . . ·
1 .00
Mrs. Caroline Belger ...
1 .00
Mrs. M"alcolm Haughton
1.00
Mn1. Fanny Hindle .. . ..
1.00
Mrs. Mabel Dickinson ..
1.00
Mrs. Clara R . Dra.per . .
1 .00
Miss Belen Cleaves . .. .
1
.00
Mrs. William Allen . . . . .
1.00
Miss Amelia Jager .... .
1
.00
Miss Ella Ruelton . .. .
1 .00
Miss Ma.ud Atkinson . . . .
Louise Chapman Botch·
1 .00
kiss ... . . . .. . .. · · · · · ·
1.00
Miss Annie Bolden ... .
1.00
Mrs. Oakes Ames ... .. . .
Mrs. Frances Crowln1 .00
sbleld .... . . · · · · · · · ·
1.00
Mrs. L . B . ATerlll. .. . ·
25.00
Mary K . Lassen .. •....
Mrs. J . ~f. Lee (Col5.00
lected) ....... · · · · · ·
Mrs. Robert Gould Shaw 100.00
1
.00
Mrs. J ames A. Bentley . .
1.00
Mrs. Mary A. Fuller : . .
1.00
lllary E. Bilton ...... . •
1.00
Mrs. Fannie Eaton ... . .
1 .00
Mrs. Rarrlet A. Bean .. .

Mrs. Rarrlet Grant. ... .
Mi ss M'. R. Gregory ... .
Dr. Emma Culbertson . .
Miss Edit h M. B owes . .
Mrs. G. R . Pierce .... .
Miss Sara E . Parsons .. .
Miss Frieda M. Parsons
Mrs. Walter- Boyden ... .
MIss Evelyn Locke .... .
lllrs. Josia h Greene Mon·
roe . ... .. .... . .... .
Miss Marga ret Howard .
Mrs. C. A. Adams ..... .
Mrs. Ch arles G. Ames ..
Mrs. Ralph Lane ...... .
Mi ss Mary E. All en ... .
Miss Sarah M. Nowell . .
Miss Annie C. Nowell ..
Mrs. L . P. Mitchell . . . .
Miss Nellie Golbe rt . .. .
Mrs. Walter Parker ... .
Mi ss E li za Parker . . . . . .
Mrs. Ji:dward Burton .. .
Mrs. John Kelley . .. . . .
Miss Charlotte J ones .. .
Miss Ada ?.11lner . . .. .. .
Miss Sarah W. Pick e r·
lng ... . . ... ... . .. . . .
Miss Ma ry 0 . Pickerin g
J\Iarlon Murdock
Miss M. E . Lombard . .
Mrs. Barthold Scblesl n·
ger .... . . . ......... .
J\IIss Julian Jennings .. .
Miss Allee Cunningham
Mrs. Edward Frothing·
ham •.. .... . ... .. .. .
Mrs . Alfred Bill ...... .
Dr. M. A. Smith . . . .. . .
Mrs. Halsted Linds ley . .
M rs. Tucker Dala nd . .. .
Mrs. J . P. Lyman . .... .
Miss Sara Linthicum .. .
Mrs. John C. Cobb . . . .
Miss Ma ry P ear son ... .
Miss Sarah Sargeant. . .
Mrs. Edward Cleveland
Mrs. J . E. Dixon . . . .. . .
E ffie M. Rartwlll . ... . .
Miss M"artha Riddel l .. .
Mrs. Elizabeth Dibble . .
Mrs. Nellie Foley .... . .
llllss Rebecca Greene .. .
lllrs. Horace Gray .... .
Mrs. Fred Robinson ... .
Mrs. Franklin Robbs . . .
Mrs. Martin P eck ... .. .
Mrs. W. W. Sbetfeld .. . .
Mrs. Robertson J a mes . .
Mrs. Reginald Jones . . ..
Mrs. Edward Cummings
Mrs. E leanor Lord . . .. .
Mrs. Ellene Palmeter . .
Miss Ca therlne Runkle.
A. W . Sabine . .. .. . . . . .
Mrs. J . G. Minot . .. .. . .
Mrs. Joseph Sette . . ... .
Miss Bernette B ach elor.
Miss F . W . Roberts ... .
Miss V. J. Porter . .... .
Mrs. Charles D. Lewis .
Miss Elizabeth L~wl s ..
Mls~ Frances Lewis . .. .
~lrs . H elen Kente . .. . . .
Mrs. T . D. Dewey .... .
Mrs. H . E . Pryor .. ... .
Miss Bertha Reynolds ..
Miss Anni e Bale ... . .. .
I' ranees W . Russell ... .
Hiss A. A. Richards ... .
~!I s s Mary Scllrlet . . .. . .
Mrs. B. A. Osgood . . . . .
Miss Luc:v Osgood . .... .
Hiss A. L. Osgood .... .
Mrs. L. C. Marshall ... .
~Irs . S. L. Power s .... .
Hrs. B. F . Pitma n .... .
Hiss Sarah Borden .... .
~ll s s Frances Blrtwell ..
!'~rah Morgan ....... . .
Hrs. Maude Ben edict .. .
~Us s Clara Matchett. . .
Mrs. M'argaret Morse . . .
Hiss May Sumner . .... .
llfrs. Charles R . Adams
Miss Elizabeth Bean . .•
Mrs. Lon Is J. Balliett . .

1.00
1.00
1 .00
1 .00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1 .00
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1.00
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1.00
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1.00
1.00
1 .00
1.00
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1.00
1.00
1.00
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1.00
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Mrs. G. L. Taber .. . ... .
Mrs. Frederick L owell . .
Mrs. Afam Dickey ..... .
Mrs. Spoon Mackey ... .
Mrs. Herbert Myrick .. .
Dr. Julia Dutton ..... .
Mrs. Mary Durgin . ... .
Miss B . P . Kimball ... .
1\frs. M. C. Crocker . .. .
Miss Belen Cushing .. . .
Mrs. Roland Baker . . .. .
M1ss Eleanor Sullivan . .
Mrs. J oseph Lovejoy .. .
Mrs. Arthur Rot ch . .. . .
Miss Louie Stanwood . .
Mrs. Gertrude P ennima n
Dr. Annie F isher . .. . . .
Annette Rogers .. ... .. .
Miss Ma rtha Silsbee . . .
Miss M. E . Selequlst .. .
Mrs. L. B. Ransom .... .
Mts. E. R . James ..... .
Mrs. Edward Rutchlnson

. ••••• • • · · · · • · · ·

Miss Lucy Sturgis . . .. .
Mi ss Mabel Cooke ..... .
1\llss Isabel H yam s . ... .
Miss E leanor R aymond.
l\lrs. John Graham Brooks
Miss Elizabeth Delano ..
lllrs. J. T. Rawklns .. ..
Miss Albertina Von Arnlm .... . . . .. . ..... .
Mrs. Percy Shatter . .. .
Mi ss Chl menR Philbrick
Mrs. Al!nes Lacy .. . .. ·
Mrs. Clara Little .... . .
Mrs. J. L. Sweet . . ... . .
Dr. nnd Mrs. Winston
Stephens . . .. .. . . . . .
Mrs. Addle Knox . .. . . . .
Mrs. Joseph Livermore.
Mrs. P . E . Blackmore ..
M1ss H elen Pratt. .... .
Mi ss M. N. Tatt. . .. . .
Mrs. G. D. Schan ck ... .
Mrs. Florence T.ewls .. .
Mrs. W . R . Rollins ... . .
Miss Anon Richardson . .
Miss 1\1. Stone .. .. . . . . .
Fnnnle L. Bayes . .. .. . .
Mrs. Cb.rle• A. Burke.
Miss Marla Purdon ....
Mrs. R entrlce Macomber
Mrs. r,. Fl. R a rrlman .. .
Mi ss F.. R. Ln lr<l . .... .
Miss E. M. Caldwell .. .
Mrs. James 'forhert ... .
Mls• f'o ra Start . . . . . . .
Miss Ellen D~bn ey .... .
M'rs . Lewis Thorpe . ... .
nr. Julia T o lm~tn . . ... .
Miss A. G. !lmlth .. .. . .
Mrs. Anna R emlrk .... .
M r~ . r.eo. J!l. P ere:v ... .
1\flss F:llen Blnsdllle . .. .
Mr•. A. A. LRwson .. . .
1-frs. f' . FJ . MeTntlre . . . .
Mrs. f'barl es Rookw•ll ..
1\f••s. Lucl!ln Newh all .. .
~trs. A. M. Rnlrtnd . .. . .
Mrs. J ohn Fl e ldln ~t . . .. .
}.frt:t. 'F.mmn Frye ..... .

Mrs. Mnr:v .T. R eatb ... .
'P.ft·R. Fr8n ('PS

Mi ss
Miss
Mr•.
Miss
Mi ss
Miss
Miss
Mi ss
Mrs .
Miss
1\frs.
Mrs.
Miss
Mrs.
Mrs.
lllrs.
Miss
Mrs.
Mrs.
Miss
Mrs.
Mrs.

N:~son

... .

T •nhe ll~ Orne .... .
Cllnrlotte Orne ... .
John EdwRr<ls ... .
Natalie Jewett . . . .

F.it n n Re~I!IO ... .. .
HHI<lrt Klemm ... . .

Mnnd McLelland ..
Esther Tucker .. . .
.Tames R a nrock .. .
Lucia Jnqulth . .. . .
LaurA. Hndson ... .
Rlrtnche Osgood .. .
Frtnnle Osgood ... .
Lonle Stevenson . . .
Sarah Tuttle .... .
Fred Emery . ..... .
Almeria Boynton ..
M'ary Beebe ..... .
S. J. Moore .. .... .
Allee Moore .. ... .
F . B. Harrington.
Philip Tripp . .... .

1.00
1.00
1.00
5. 00
1.00
1.00
1 .00
1.00
1.00
1.00

nn

1
l.OO

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1 .00
1.00
1 .00
1.00
1.00
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1 .00
1.00
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1.00
1 .00
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1 .00
1.00
1.00
1 .00
1.00
1.00
1 .00
1.00
1.00
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1 .00
1 .00
1.00
1.01)
1 .00

1 .00
1.00

1.00
1 .00

1 .00
1.00
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1 .00

1 .00
1 .00

1 .00
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1 .00
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~. 00

1.00
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}

l

Mrs. Chester Reed . ... .
1.00
Miss Emily Russey .... .
1.00
Mrs. Jonas Gates ..... .
1.00
1.00
Mro. Louise Smith ... . .
Miss Esther Dimick . .. .
1.00
1.00 .
Miss Adeline Sy lvester.
Mrs. A. J . Joyce .... : . .
1.00
1.00
Mrs. Henry Rlscock . ..
1.00
Miss Au ~ trl ce Flanders.
Mrs. M C Elliott . ....
1.00
Mrs. L. Kl·unecutt. .
! 00
2.00
Mrs. G. Graham Mill er.
Miss Agnes Garrison . ..
1.00
lllrs. Arthu r Livermore. 34.00
Ant hony League D. of C.
7.85
Mr. John R . Dean .... .
1.00
1.00
Mrs. A. J . Mundy .... . .
1.00
Mrs. Rarr~et Bergmrtn ..
1.00
Mrs. Walter Hunter .. .
1.00
Mrs. John C. Lee ..... .
1.00
Katherine B. Shute .. . .
1.00
F lorence Bucb . . .... . . .
1.00
Miss M"a rgaret Norton ..
1 .00
Mrs. Sa rah Van Noorden
1.00
1\Irs. George Wallace .. .
2 .00
Mrs. Arthur Gay ... ... .
Mi ss Eugenia Frothing1.00
bam . .. ... ... · · · · · · ·
Ma t·y Claire O' Brien . .. . 10.00
1.00
Mrs. G lendower Evans.
1.00
Miss Belen Coolidge . . .
1.00
Mrs. Selma Lo9tz .... . .
1.00
Mrs. G. R . P a rker . .. . .
1.00
Mrs. Marcus Foster .. . .
1.00
Miss Bertha Reed ..... .
1.00
Mrs. Bowen Lutts ... . .
1.00
Mrs. Paul Keene . . .... .
1.00
Miss Lena SteTens .... .
1 .00
Mrs. W . B. J,owe\1 • ....
1 .00
Mrs. D. 8. Taylor, Jr . .
1.00
Miss Rarrlet Richardson
1.00
Miss Lucy Sampson .. . .
1.00
Mra. R . B. Rill. ..... . .
Mrs. L ewis J . Cox .. . . . 81.00
1.00
Mrs. H. J. Brett ...... .
1.00
Miss M. R. Munroe .. . .
1.00
Mrs. Ellen Van Ostrand
1.00
Mrs. Emma Metcalf .. ..
Equal Suffrage League,
Baltimore ...... ... . . 19.10
l'.frs. S. S. Mitts .. .. . . . 20.00
1.00
Lucia McBride .. ...... .
1 .00
Annn R . Shaw . .... ... .
H elen Eacker .. .... . .. . 10.00
Mrs. Shnler (Collection
nnit Literature llla lne
School) . ... . ... .. . . 113.20
Total ........... . $774.40

ANNUAL PLEDGES
Mrs. R . C. Langdon .... $50.00
Eq. Sut. League of N. C. 15.00
F:relyn R . Ordway.. . . . 20.00
Mi ss Julia Rogers. . . . . . 100.00
Mrs. Jos. Macpherson. . 100.00
Minn. W . S. Assn . . . . . 750.00
Dr. Wm. Allee.. .. ..... 30.00
M"rs. Wm. Allee....... 30.00
Mrs. Robt. Gould Shaw 1,000.00
D. of C. Col. E . S. L.. . 25.00
Carrie C. Catt ... . .. . .. 273.82
Mrs Lewis J . Cox . . .... 50.00
V ot~s t or Women League
ot North Dakota . . . . 25.00
Conn. W . S. Assn .. . • . . · 10.00
Pol. Eq. League, Little
Rock, Ark .......... . 50.69
Dr. Katharine B . Davis 25.00
Ky. E . Rights Assn ...• 150.00
Conn. W. S. Assn ... .. . 199.00
Mrs. John C. L ee .. . .. . 200.00
Mra. D. 0 . lves .. . . ... . 25.00
Mo. Eq. Suf. Assn .... . 25.00
Mass. Pol. Eq. Union .. . 100.00
Eq. Sut. League, Balto. 17.88
Chicago Eq. Suf. Assn .. 582.00
Mrs. Ra y mond R obins . . 100.00
Total ......... $3,903.39

DUES
Nat. Council Women
Voters • . . . . . . . • • . . . .

50.00

Total .. ....... . . $4,727.79

·RAGE NEWS

WHITE SPACES
INDICATE GOOD
LEGISLATION

Page 15

BLACK SPACES
INDICATE POOR
LEGISLATION

OR NONE AT ALL IN REGARD TO THE FOLLOWING:
7. Age of Consent-18 years-(Unchaste)
1. Child Labor-14 years
4. Minimum Wa~e
2. Compulsory Education
8. Red Light Abatement
5. Mothers' PensiOn
9. Prohibition
3. Eight or nine hour day £or women
6. Equal Guardianship
(Chart is based on compilations to date of January 1, 1917. Since that date North Dakota and Ohio have been added
to the suffrage column.)

It will be seen that there are in the twelve suffrage
states thirty-two black spaces in all, an aver,age of

2.66.
It will also be seen that there are in the thirty-six
non-suffrage states 186 black spaces, an average of

5.16.

Judged by social legislation, women and children
are, therefore, nearly twice as well off in suffrage as
in non-suffrage states.
It is to be remembered in this connection that
neither women nor children are employed in industry
in appreciable numbers in most of the suffrage states.
This accounts for such agricultu ral states as Wyoming, Idaho, Utah and Arizona, ~·or instance, having
black spaces in the first circle. They are without a
child labor problem of any moment and they do not
put laws on their statute books to cover a situation

that does not exist. Wyoming had exactly seventeen
children between the ages of ten and fifteen in factories, according to the last United States Census.
Compare the application of the mother's pension
laws of New York and of Wyoming. In New York
the mother must work when the father is disabled and
she receives only ten dollars a month for the first
child. In Wyoming a mother is pensioned if the
father is disabled, dead, or has deserted the family,
and twenty dollars a month is allowed for the first
child.
This is the only chart of the kind so far issued with
the sanction of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Acknowledgment-is made to Mrs.
J. G::. Holman, of St. Paul, for the ingenious device
whereby the showing is made.

Page 16

NI\TIONAL 5
_, tzzard, "doing everything, from scrubbing
to speaking with Mrs. Catt, Mrs. Snowden,
Congressman Keating and recently with Mrs. McClung.'' She carried on the complete suffrage filing
system for Buffalo, doing the filing herself, along wi.th
various other odd jobs. One of the latter was the
running of the Business \iVomen's Club, which she
started and made a profit out of, through their fifteencent hot suppers. Gradually she emerged as a street
corner speaker, having two, three and four speeche~
every night all the spring and summer of the 191 5
campaign and speaking through the country districts
as well as the cities. She ran all the press work for
the eighth campaign district, the largest in the state,
and for the city of Buffalo, the second largest in the
state. After the campaign she was elected city chairman and had entire charge of the city of Buffalo.
She has been, " for a dim, dark, and forgotten number
of years," on the Buffalo Express, and is the youngest officer of any State Federation of Women's clubs,
being recording secretary of the New York organization, after two years as its press chairman. She has
written children's stories which have been printed in
various magazines, but this is her first sustained effort.
She is a member of the Scribblers of Buffalo, an
organization limited to 30 members invited ior their
literary work and containing such illustrious lights as
Anna Katherine Green and Marian de Forest, dramatizer of " Little Women' ' and "Erstwhile Susan." Several of her amateur plays and monologues have been
done in Buffalo. That's about all, except that she
"adores cooking and hates street speaking."
Her book is issued in an attractive dress at $1.05
postpaid! by the National Woman Suffrage Publishing Company.
~

FOR RENT-ONE PEDESTAL

MISS MARJORIE SHULER

It is also for sale-apply to National Suffrage Publishing Company. And it is not a pedestal. It is a
book-the story of a suffrage campaign, and a bright
and breezy girl's part in it.
The propaganda novel is a difficult proposition, but
Miss Marjory Shuler has walked up to it with the
same rippling sense of humor and the same buoyancy
of spirit that made her a lively and original figure in
the "Eighth District" during the 1915 suffrage campaign in New York State. Those who have been
through a campaign will read this gay little record
with frequent reminiscent chuckles. And those who
have not been through a campaign will read it chucklingly just the same. There is a fund of suffrage information and argument in it; there is advice; there is
human experience, and woman experience, and political
experience. And it is all off-haadedly given, so that
the reader has the sense of enjoying a breezy book
rather than of being tutored in suffrage tactics. One
instance will illustrate. Concerning the art of suffrage speaking, the young heroine says:
".l\fy attempt at a comprehensive, logical outline
failed completely. No one wanted to hear my speech.
Those who stopped for a minute were restless, made
comments and soon melted away.
"Finally in desperation I told the story of a little
girl who went to have dinner with a great man. All
during the meal she was anxious to speak. The great
man silenced her. When des, ~ rt was served, he
asked, 'Now, little girl, what do you want to say?'
"She replied, 'Please, sir, it's too late now. I
wanted to tell you there was a \I'Orm on your lettuce,
but you ate it.'
"As I told the story I reali~ed that my voice had
been patronizing like the man's. I began to talk
simply about things women want to remedy before it
is too late. The crowd grew and grew."
The young author went through the last campaign

~

~
\IJ.

Woman Suffrage
Year Book
1917
Edited by
MARTHA G. STAPLER

The first attempt to issue under one cover
information on the following subjects-and more!
Calendar of Suffrage Events in 1916, Suffrage History,
Arguments, Statistics, Charts, Bibliography, International Alliance, Federal Amendment, Presidential
Suffrage, State Referenda, Lists of Associations in the
United States, Suffrage Planks in Party Platforms,
Effect of Woman Suffrage, Number of Women Voters.
Laws Affecting Women and Children, Persons Excluded
from Suffrage, Jury' Service and Poll Tax, Facts for
Suffrage Workers,Sentiment in Favor, Cost of Elections.

Paper.' Postpaid $1.05

...

Edition Limited-Order Now!

National Woman ·Suffrage Publishing Co., Inc.
171 Madison Avem e
I

New York City