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STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE l1PR.A'{\
DANBURY, CONNECTICUT

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STATE NORMAL SCHOOL

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Annual Catalogue 1929-1930

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE LIBR.AR)'
DANBURY,CONNECTICUT

State Normal School
Danbury, Connecticut

Annual Catalogue
1929-1930

2-30 -900

STA TE BOARD OF EDUCATION
1930
H.

]OHN
ERNEST

Governor .

TRUMBULL,

E.

ROGERS,

S.

FREDERICK

L.

CHARLES

]ONES,

Plainville

Lieutenant-Governor
Chairman

New London
New Haven

AMES

Hartford

CURTISS

Greenwich

]ULIAN

W.

WALTER

D. Hoon .

Winsted

LEROY A . HOWLAND

Middletown

LUTHER

Putnam

M.

MRS.

HELEN

]OHN

G.

HENRY

KEITH
E.

Stratford

LEWIS

Talcottville

TALCOTT

A.

Norwich

TIRRELL

ALBERT B. MEREDITH,
Secretar3, a11d Commissioner of Education, Hartford
ALONZO F. MYERS,
Director of the Division of Teacher Preparation
OFFICE

State Capitol, Hartford, Conn.

4

OFFICERS
Normal School
D.

LOTHROP

HIGGINS

Principal; Introduction
Ph.B. (Brown).
MAY

to Teaching

SHERWOOD

Supervisor of Training; School Mana_qement
Graduate , Danbury Normal School; B.S. (Columbia);
Columbia.

K.

AUGUSTA

JESSE

School;

E. FrncH
G eo{Jraphy; History
Ph.B. (Upper Iowa College);
H.

M.A.

B.S.

(Columbia);

Student , Graduate

School,

(Columbia);

Student,

Columbia.

BRILL

Superintendent
A.B. (Miami);

D.

HAZEL

School,

SUTTON

Social Studies; Handwritinr,
Graduate, Danbury Normal
Columbia.
GRANT

Student , Graduate

of Training Schools; Principles of Education
M.A. (Columbia);
Student, University
of Illinois.

TOBIAS

Art; Supervisor of Art in Training Schools
G1·aduate, Illinois State Normal, Pratt Institute;
Arts, Chicago; School of Applied Art, Chicago.
RUTHE.

Student,

Academy

of

Fine

HOLBROOK

}.,fusic; Supervisor of Music in Training Schools
Graduate, Keene Normal School; Certificate, Institute
ampton.
ELOISE

M.

M.

Danbury

High School.

HARRISON

Reading and Literature;
Enolish
B.S. in Ed. (Kent State College);
BEULAH

R.

M.A.

(Columbia).

B.S.

(Columbia);

CONOVER

Nature Study; Hygiene
Graduate, Trenton Normal
MARGARET

E.

School;

Student,

Cornell.

CRITCHFIELD

Librarian; Library Course
B.S. (Skidmore
College);
Graduate,
Pratt Institute
Library
Teach ers College, Columbia; Pennsylvania
State College.

L.

EDITH

E.

Ethics
State College fo,· Teachers);

Student,

M.A.

(Columbia).

FISH

Physical Edu,cation; P.E. S11,pervisor in Training Schools
Graduate, Cleveland Norma l School; B.S. (University
of
(Columbia); Diploma, Supervisor of Physical Education.
FLORINE

School;

SPENCER

Dean of Women;
B.S. (New York
MARJORIE

North-

PARMELEE

Secretary
Graduate,
PHEBE

of Music Pedagogy,

TOWNSEND

Psychology; Arithmetic
A.Il. (York College, Nebraska);

M.A. (Columbia).

5

Wisconsin);

M.A.

J

CORA].

RUSSELL
Rnral Education;
English
Graduate , Platteville,
Wisconsin,
State
College of Colorado); M.A. (Columbia).
G. GRAEF
Clerk
Graduate, Danbury

Normal

School;

B.A.

(Wes.tern

State

BEATRICE

High

School.

Locust A venue Training School
D.

ANNIE

KYLE

Principal;
Graduate,
GERTRUDE

M.

Grade Seven
New Britain

Grade Seven
Graduate, Danbury

F.

MARGARET

S.

C.

K.

Student,

Teachers

College, Columbia.

Normal

School;

Student,

Teachers

College,

Columbia .

Normal

School;

Student,

Teachers

College,

Columbia .

Normal

School.

Teachers

College,

Columhia.

Island

College of Education)

.

TRIESCHMAN

Grade Fonr
Graduate , Danbury

Normal

School;

Student,

BAILEY

Grade Three
Graduate , Kalamazoo
Chicago Art Jnstitute;
GLADYS

M.

Teachers
College;
Boston University.

MARGUERITE

Teachers

College,

Ypsilanti;
A. B. (Albion
College, Columhia.

Columbia;

College);

Student.

of Chicago;

Teachers

SHERM AN

Grade One
Graduate.
Plymouth
Normal School;
College, Columbia; Cornell University.
GRACE M.

Student,

ERICSON

Grade Two
Graduate,
Michigan
State College,
of \¥isconsin;
Teachers
University

A.

Columbia.

BEHAN

LouisE

EDITH

College,

STRAIT

Grade Five
B.E. (Rhode
M.

Teachers

M ARHOFFER

Grade Five
Graduate, Danbury
MARY

Student,

Norma l School;

Grade Six
Graduate, Danbury
RUTH

School;

LYNCH

Grade Six
Graduate, Danbury
GLADYS

Normal

MURPHY

Student , University

SMITH

Assistant
Graduate,

to the Pri11cijml
Danh11ry Normal

School.

Balmforth A venue Training School
7
\

ICTOR

A.

BLACKMER

Principal
Graduate,
INEZ

E.

Fitchburg

Normal

School;

Student , Teachers

College. Columbia.

Student,

Co11ege, Columbia;

Pou.ARD

Grade Seven
Graduate, VV01-cester No1·111alSchool;
University.

6

Teachers

Clark

C.

EMMA

BURGER

Grad e Seven
Graduate , Danbury
JULIA

School;

Stud ent , Teachers

College,

Columbia.

Normal

School;

Student , Clark Univ ers ity.

S. HE N EBRY

Grad e S ix

Graduate , Danbury
ALICE

Normal

M.

ScHLEIER

Grade Six
Graduate,
Washington
State Normal
CoJlege, PuJlman);
M.A. (Columbia).
ANNA

E.

B.A.

(Washington

State

ScoLLIN

Grade F ive
Student, Danbury
HELEN

School , Cheney;

Normal

School , Clark

University.

DONOVAN

Grade Five
Graduate, Danbury Normal School; Student,
Teachers CoJlege, Columbia.
HARRIET

C.

K.

Schoo];

Student,

University

of Maine;

Castine

Help-

SPOONER

Grade Four
Graduate, Danbury
]ESSIE

Summer Normal School;

E . O'BRIEN

Grade Four
Graduate, Castine Normal
ing-Teacher School.
EDITH

Connecticut

Normal

School;

Student,

Teachers

CoJlege, Columbia.

ToRRACA

Grade Three
Graduate, Danbury Normal School; Student,
Teachers CoJlege, Columbia.
MARY

A.

Connecticut

Summer Normal School;

GREENE

Grade Three
Graduate,
ANNA

H.

Danbury

Normal

Grade Tu:o
Graduate, Massachusetts
College, Columbia.
EDITH

School; . Student , Teachers

College , Columbia.

SHANKON

State

Normal

School, North

Adams;

Student,

Teachers

RAY

Grade T w o
Graduate, Danbury
CORRINE

D.

Normal School.

O'CONNELL

Grade Two
Graduate,
SUE

B.

New Britain

Normal

School.

COOK

Grade One
Graduate, Virginia

State Teachers CoJle ge , FarmviJle;
Diploma as Supervisor of Primary Schools.

IRENE

D.

B.S . in Ed.

(Columbia);

ALLEN

Grade One
Graduate, Danbury

Normal

School;

Student.

Teachers

CoJlege, Columbia;

Clark

University.
MARGUERITE

L.

WHEELER

Pr eprimary
Graduate, New Britain

Normal

School;

7

Student , Teachers

College,

Columbia.

Rural Training Schools
H.

PAULINE

DAXK

Miry Brook Rnral School
Graduate. Danbury Xormal
1IURIEL

].

School;

Teachers

College, Columbia.

BARDWELL

Mill Plain Rural School
Graduate, Geneseo State Normal

\,Vr"FIELD

Student,

S.

Engineer,

How ARD C.

School, New York;

PEASE

Normal

School

DuRGY

Janitor, Normal School

E. BENEDICT
Assistant Engineer,

ROBERT

P·:onnal School

8

B.S.

(Columbia).

CALENDAR
1929-30

Fall term begins
Danbury Fair Day
State Teachers Conventi on
Thanksgiving
recess
Fall term closes
Winter term begins
Lincoln's Birthday
Winter term closes
Spring term begins
Memorial Day
Spring term closes
Examinations
for admission

September
October
October
November
December
January
February
April
April
May
June
June

4
11
25
28-Dec.
20
2
12
17
28
30
19
7

September
October
October
November
December
January
February
April
April
June
June
September

3
10
24
27-30
23 ......--

1930-31

Fall term begins
Danbury Fair Day
State Teachers Convention
Thanksgiving
recess
Fall term closes
Winter term begins
Washington's
Birthday
Winter term closes
Spring term begins
Spring term closes
Examinations
for admission
Fall term begins

9

r

J

23
2
13
18
6
9

1

DANBURY

STATE NORMAL

SCHOOL

LOCATION

Danbury is a city of about 25,000, on the western border
of Connecticut and in the northern part of Fairfield County.
It is a junction point for the railway lines from New York to
Pittsfield and from Poughkeepsie
to Willimantic,
besides
direct lines from Litchfield, Bridgeport and New Haven. The
city lies in a broad plain surrounded by the low wooded hills
that mark the beginning of the Berkshire range. Although a
city in size and form of government, it has the atmosphere of
a large New England town; its streets are lined with trees
and its homes are largely owned by those who occupy them.
The normal school property is on White Street, on the
bus line and about six minutes' walk from the railway station.
Its training schools are the city schools on Locust Avenue
and Balmforth Avenue, with rural schools at Miry Brook and
at Mill Plain.
PURPOSE

The purpose of this school, as set forth in the statute
under which it was established, is that of "training teachers in
the art of instructing and governing in the public schools of
this state." Being supported entirely by taxation of the people
of the state, it is the duty of the normal school to prepare
teachers for the public schools of Connecticut.
The obligation thus plainly laid upon the school is ever
its guiding principle.
It seeks to give to the elementary
schools of this state teachers who are not only skillful, informed and intelligent, but whose habits and ideals shall make
them faithful and effective public servants.
EQUIPMENT

The normal school building is a modern structure having
a capacity of about two hundred students.
Classrooms are
furnished with individual desks for the members of the school.
An extensive library supplies all textbooks as well as books
of reference and magazines.
The school is equipped with
scientific material, and excellent provision is made for art
work. A gymnasium furnishes opportunity for instruction in
games and other indoor exercise, while the grounds are suffi10

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A TRAINING

SCHOOL

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cient to allow tennis and other outdoor sports.
A residence
hall, opened in 1927, makes it possible for a considerable number of our students to enjoy the benefits of dormitory life.
ADMISSION

..

The privileges of the school are open to residents of this
state over sixteen years old and of suitable character, who
declare their intent to teach in the public schools of Connecticut, and who satisfy the conditions as set forth below.
It is undersfood that none enter this school except for the
purpose of becoming teachers.
The intent to do so is declared
by every candidate who signs an application for admission.
Evident lack of this purpose as revealed by unfaithfulness,
or
the disclosure of characteristics
that disqualify one for the
teaching profession, are regarded as sufficient warrant for dismissal from the school.
Following are the specific conditions for admission as
adopted by the State Board of Education.
A.

General and Academic Requirements

1. Be sixteen (16) years of age or over at the time of admission.
2. Be free from physical defects which would unfit them for the work
of a teacher.
The acceptance of the applicant, all other requirements being met, is
conditioned upon her satisfactorily passing · a physical examination to be given
at the normal school she proposes to enter, at stated dates before the opening
of the school, or as soon as possible thereafter.
3. Present evidence of graduation from a four-year course in an approved
public or private high school, or possess an equivalent academic education
(See High School Form 12). High School Form 12 should be completed
at the earliest possible date and sent to the Bureau of Academic Credentials,
State Board of Education, for validation. It will be forwarded from that
office to · the normal school principal.
4. Must offer evidence of having completed at least fifteen units of
work.*
5. Of the fifteen units prescribed at least ten must be taken from the
following list.
6. Not less than three from the same list must be taken in the senior
year.
7. Present satisfactory testimonials of moral character, and recom mendations and ratings of public school officials.
8. Present application to the principal of the normal school to which
entrance is sought.
9. Declare intention to teach in the public schools of the state.
10. Present self at the normal school on date and hour specified for such
examinations and interviews as may be prescribed.
* A "unit of work" constitutes the successful completion of prepared work taken at
least four periods per week for one year.
Unprepared work counts as one -half time.

13

English .
.
.
3 units
General Mathematics I .
1 unit
General Mathematics II
1 unit
Algebra
1 unit
Geometry
.
.
. . . .
1 unit
Social Studies (History, Civics, Economics) 1 to 3 units
Latin
2 to 3 units
French
2 to 3 units
See: Note German
2 to 3 units
Spanish
2 to 3 units
Italian
2 to 3 units
Physics
1 unit
Chemistry
1 unit
Biology
1 unit
Botany
'
to 1 unit each
½
Zoology
General Science
unit
Geography
l
Physiology
Hygiene
Commercial Arithmetic .
½ to 1 unit each
Civics
Astronomy
Geology
NOTE: Foreign language units, when offered, shall be at least two in
any one language.
The remaining five units, one of which may be fourth-year English, may
be taken from any of the regular work of the school, except that no course
of less than one-half unit credit will be accepted. It is advised, however,
that a part of the five units be in Drawing and in Vocal Music.

s

l

j

B. Time of Examinations

and Presentation

of Credentials

All applicants for admission must present their applications properly certified to not later than the first day of June, 1930. All applicants will present
themselves at the normal school which they desire to enter at 8 :30 A. M.
( Standard Time) on Saturday, June 7, for the following: Mental Alertness
Test, General Information Test, and interview. Applications received after
June 1 and prior to August 1 will be considered only in the event that the
quota of students for admission to the normal school to which application is
made is not filled by acceptable candidates whose applications are received
by June 1.
The results of these tests and interviews will be used for the purpose of
enabling the normal school principal to make a proper selection of candidates
for admission from among those who meet the minimum conditions for
admission when more candidates apply than can be admitted to the normal
school.

C.

All applications for admission to the regular work of the Connecticm
state normal schools upon other terms than those specified in Sections A and
B must be made directly to the Commissioner of Education, Hartford,
Connecticut.
Application for Admission
Each candidate for admission to a Connecticut state normal school is
required to fill out an application blank (Normal School Form 1). After
this has been done and the necessary certification of high school graduation,
scholarship level and character has been made by the high school principal,
as provided for on page 2 of Normal School Form 1, the application must
14

be sent to the principal of the normal school to which the candidate is an
applicant for entrance.
Copies of this form may be secured by application to the normal school
principals at Danbury, New Britain, New Haven and Willimantic, respectively .
HEALTH

EXAMINATION

The work of the school, like that of the profession for
which it aims to prepare, requires that those who undertake it
shall be sound in physical health.
In order to assure this so
far as possible, the school provides for a physical and health
examination by competent physicians and requires that each
applicant shall pass this examination.
The examinations will
be given during the summer vacation by appointment
with
the physician in Danbury or elsewhere.
Those who cannot
be examined during the summer may enter the school in
September only upon the under standing that they must withdraw if they fail to pass this examination
early in the fall
term.
TIME OF ENTRANCE

The fall term begins Wednesday following the first Monday of September.
Students are expected to be present at the
opening exercises in the assembly hall at 10 :30.
Classes are organized and work is begun the opening clay
of the first term. Much of the work is so unlike that of the
secondary school to which the students are accustomed, that
attendance upon the first lessons of each course is especially
important.
Students entering late are regarded as absent
from the first clay, and they suffer a proportionate
loss of
credit in each course.
Candidates appearing after the opening clay will be required to apply for admission to the Commissioner of Education at Hartford, even though their papers may have been
accepted.
REPORTS

Reports of each student's progress are sent quarterly at
the encl of each ten-week period to her parent or guardian.
These reports constitute official notice of her standing and an
indication of her prospects, the ratings being fully explained
thereon.
No other notice should be expected, but parents are
urged to confer with us after receiving such reports.
15

GRADUATION

At the encl of the two-year course diplomas will be
awarded to those who
1. have throughout
the course maintained a standard of
conduct befitting a teacher;
2. have attained the required standard of scholarship 111
every prescribed subject;
3. haYe exhibited a fair degree of skill in teaching and
governing children.
Such graduates
will receive a Limited Normal School
Certificate.
CREDIT FOR ADV AN CED WORK

Several institutions of college grade recognize the diploma
of this school by giving advanced standing to those who hold
it. In the education department
of some universities
this
credit is such as to make it possible with extra work to complete the four-year course in two years.
A two-year professional course at the normal school followed by two years of
special subjects at the university offers an excellent prepara tion for high school teaching.
SCHOLARSHIPS

By an act of the General Assembly, students who fulfill
certain conditions may receive from the state treasury monthly
sums to be applied toward paying their living expenses.
The
purpose of this provision is to assure a supply of trained
teachers for the smaller towns of the state; hence the students
who receive such scholarships must be recommended
by the
proper authorities in one of the small towns, and must agree
to teach in one of such towns for a period of two years after
graduation.
It is also required by the school faculty that the
holders of such scholarships
shall maintain a satisfactory
standard in their work at the school; students failing to do
so must expect the scholarship to be withdrawn.
The conditions
under which these scholarships
an,
granted are clearly set forth in the statute which established
them, a copy of which is given below. Further information
may be had on application to the principal.
16

Sec. 4, Chap. 213, Acts of 1929.-"The
state board of education may, at all times, maintain, in any of the normal schools,
one student, selected on the basis of scholarship and general
fitness, for each town in the state having average annual receipts from taxation of thirty-nine
thousand dollars or less,
upon the recommendation
of the board of education of such
town; and , for students admitted to said schools under the
provisions of this section, living expenses, not to exceed three
hundred dollars for each pupil in any one year, shall be provided by said state board of education free of charge.
Each
person entering a normal school under the provisions of this
section shall enter into an agreement with the state board of
education to remain at the normal school for two years, unless
in case of ill healh or dismissal by the school authorities, and
to teach in a one or two teacher school in one of the towns
from which such students are nominated or appointed for a
period of two years after graduation unless excused by the
state board of education."
EXPENSES

'

The school makes no charge for tmtton, laboratory fees,
or the use of library books. Students furnish pencils and notebooks, as well as a few drawing supplies and a gymnasium
suit. They are also advised , but not required, to buy a few
books and some material that will be useful in their profession.
Board and lodging may be secured at rates from $8.00 a week
upward.
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS

Our residence hall provides for eighty-five students, under
the direct oversight of the clean of women. The rooms accommodate two students each. Charges are proportionate
to the
cost of maintenance, estimated annually on the basis of experience. At present the charge is $325 per year, payable quarterly in ad va nce. This includes board and room and a reasonable supply of bedding and table linen. Towels, soap and
extra blankets are furnished by the student.
Only a small number of the entering class can be accommodated at the hall. An effort is made to distribute these
opportunities
geographically,
so that many localities may be
represented.
Selections for the coming year will be made
17

from those whose applications for dormitory reservations are
received before June first. All who intend to enter the school
and desire to live at the hall should write to us for an application blank before the midd le of May.
For those who cannot be accommodated at the hall, private homes located variously about the city are open to individuals or small groups.
Usually two students share one
room, and those who can do so may seek such accommodation together.
A list of available places will be sent to those
asking for it, and the dean will gladly help students who seek
her at the residence hall during the two weeks before school
opens. It is important to have engaged living accommodations before coming to school.
A few students who can secure rooms without meals at
homes near the school may board at the hall and enjoy the
social activities of those who live there. The rate is $240 for
the school year, payable quarterly in advance.
NON - RESIDENCE

Daily commutation from a distance is generally undesirable. Those who plan to do so should make sure that they
can arrive at the times indicated by the schedule.
SCHEDULE

For 1930-31, the daily
school begins at 8 :40 and
from 12 :06 to 1 :15. During
students are at the school
to 4 :15. Class periods are

schedule of classes in the normal
ends at 3 :49, with an intermission
training periods (see page 35) the
from 8 :15 to 12 :00 and from 1 :15
each 50 minutes in length.

ASSEMBLY

Assembly occupies a full class period on Monday and
Thursday mornings throughout
the year.
Programs are in
charge of the assembly committee and they involve a large
measure of student participation.
Different types of school
activities are exemplified by student groups and addresses by
teachers, students, and outside speakers are frequent.
Assem bly singing and other forms of music enrich the programs
that are designed to be always educational.
Attendance
is
expected of all members of the school.
18

EXTRA-CURRICULUM

ACTIVITIES

To extend the opportunities for students to gain by carrying responsibility,
to foster a suitable school spirit, and to
promote the general welfare , the students and all school
officers are organized as a Cooperative Government Association. Its chief executive body is a Council, composed entirely
of students.
The officers are chosen by secret preferential
b~llot by the entire association;
the other councillors are
chosen by the student divisions that they represent.
Standing
committees, including a Welfare Committee, Assembly Committee, Library Committee, and Social Committee are composed of faculty members appointed by the principal and student members appointed by the council.
Various clubs are organized and all must be chartered by
the Council. These at present include the Glee Club, Rural
Club, Dramatic Club, Athletic Club, Nature Club, and The
Forum.
The several committees and clubs, together with class
and division activities and the house organization of the residence hall, offer much opportunity
for students to exercise
leadership and carry responsibility.
Effort is made to foster
their growth in these particulars by placing as much as pos sible in their hands.
Other extra -curriculum activities include certain social
functions, some of which are traditional and some spontan eous, tournaments in tennis, basket ball and other sports, skating, hiking and picnics. The senior class prepares and pub lishes a weekly news sheet Dee N esS, which was established
by the class of 1925.
GYMNASIUM

Every student on entering the school must be provided
with a gymnasium costume, the details of which are prescribed
and will be indicated to each applicant who is accepted.
Physical education is a regular part of the school curricu lum, and a student who is physically unable to take part in the
work of the gymnasium cannot be regarded as qualified for
teaching and should not hope to receive a diploma.
19

STUDENT

WELFARE

lt is the hope and purpose of the faculty that every student shall at all times be making steady progress toward becoming a superior teacher, and that she shall be happy in doing
so. The principal is always glad to receive and confer with
any students upon matters concerning their work or welfare.
Every student who feels in need of counsel or who wishes to
bring any matter to the attention of the principal may freely
call upon him or the dean. The chairman of the Welfare
Committee may be consulted by those desiring responsible
student counsel.
ALUMNAE

AW ARDS

The Alumnae Association offers two gold medals, which
are awarded annually at the graduation exercises to the senior
who has made the highest scholarship
record during her
course, and the senior who in the opinion of the faculty has
shown the highest general excellence.
In June, 1929, these
medals were awarded as follows: for scholarship, Frances A.
Fleming of Danbury; for general excellence, Grace M. Collins
of Norwalk.
EMPLOYMENT

The school cannot guarantee employment to its graduates.
Yet our supervisor of training maintains an employment service throughout
the spring term and makes a considerable
effort to place those who will be graduated in June. We believe that any student who makes a good record may be reasonably sure of an opportunity
to teach in Connecticut the .
school year following graduation.
SERVICE

TO ALUMNAE

The use of the school library is extended to graduates
free of expense excepting that of returning the books. The
privilege carries two months' retention of any books that are
useful in school work excepting large reference works.
The
school makes an effort to giye specific help to those of its
graduates who are found to be having particular difficulty in
their early school years, and requests on the part of its graduates for this or any other professional assistance will receive
consideration and such action as may be possible.
20

EXTENSION

COURSES

The normal school staff is prepared within the limits of
available resources to offer courses in various subjects if they
are requested by a sufficiently large group of teachers.
They
may be given at the school or elsewhere if arrangements
can
be made. The courses that may be offered will be arranged
in accordance with a program of extension work coordinated
through the Division of Teacher Preparation
of the State
Board of Education and under the auspices of the Connecticut
University Extension Committee.

21

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CURRICULA
Approved

OF THE CONNECTICUT
by the State

Board

STATE

of Education,

NORMAL
January

16, 1929

No.of
SO-minute
Periods
18

First Year

Subject
Semester
Introduction to Teaching ................
1
Educational Psychology .................. 3
Oral and Written English .............. 4
Literature .......................................... 3
Library Technique .......................... 1
Social Studies
History and Civics ...................... 4
Geography ...................................... 4
Nature Study .................................... 3
Music .................................................. 2
Art ...................................................... 3
Physical Education .......................... 2
Observation and Participation ........ 4

SCHOOLS

Hours

~

72
~

18

(1 on laboratory basis) ..........
(Laboratory basis) ..................
(Laboratory basis) ..................
(Laboratory basis) ..................
(Laboratory basis) ..................

Total .................................... 34
Hours per week of prepared and unprepared work: 22-.

72
72
72
72
108
72
144
828

No. of
SO-minute
Hours
Periods
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 54
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 90
(Laboratory basis) .................. 36
54
36
( 1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
18
(1½ hours for 1) .................... 243
(1 on laboratory basis) .......... 72

Second Year (Intermediate)

Subject
Semester
Oral and Written English .............. 2
Arithmetic .................:........................ 3
Reading and Literature ................ 3
Teaching Social Studies .................. 4
Handwriting ...................................... 1
Principles of Education .................. 3
School Management ........................ 2
Rural Education .............................. 3
Professional Ethics .......................... 1
Student-Teaching
............................ 9
Health and Physical Education......
3

Total .................................... 34
Hours per week of prepared and unprepared work: 22-.

819

No. of
SO-minute
Hours
Periods
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 54
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 54
(Laboratory basis) .................. 36
36
36
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
18
( 1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
(1 on laboratory basis)............ 72
( 1½ hours for 1) .................... 243

Second Year (Kindergarten-Primary)

Subject
Semester
Oral and Written English .............. 2
Arithmetic .......................................... 3
Reading and Literature .................. 3
Teaching Social Studies .................. 2
Handwriting ...................................... 1
Principles of Education .................. 2
School Management ........................ 2
Rural Education .............................. 3
Professional Ethics ........................ 1
Health and Physical Education .... 3
Kindergarten-Primary
Education.. . 3
Student-Teaching .............................. 9

Total .................................... 34
Hours per week of prepared and unprepared work:
24

837
22.

COURSES

OF INSTRUCTION

PROFESSION AL COURSES

1.

Introduction to Teaching

The purposes of this course are: (a) to provide the student
with an introduction to the profession-an
initial comprehensive preview of the whole program of education;
(b) to inform the student as to prerequisites
for successful teaching
in the several grades of the elementary school; and ( c) to
acquaint the student with the technical and more commonly
used terms of the profession
The course in Introduction
to
Teaching, therefore, has three functions: orientation, guidance
and vocabulary.
The chief topics or units discussed are:
1. Nature and importance of the teaching profession.
2. Organization
of American public education.

3. Function of the public school and its curriculum.
4. General character of normal school work.
5. Possible careers in education .
. Junior
2.

Year

Educational

18 periods

1 semester

hour

Psychology

The whole public school system should be viewed from the
standpoint of the nature and needs of the child. If the teacher
is to intelligently stimulate and guide learning, he must have
a thorough knowledge of:
1. Original

nature, its automatic processes,
instinctive
tendencies to activity, and its capacities.
2. The laws which govern and the principles which underlie learning-that
process by which original nature
is modified and developed and behavior made increasingly satisfactory.
3. Child development
and the type of school work
adapted to each stage in this development.
4. Individual differences-their
nature and significance
to instruction and the arrangement of school work.
This course, through lectures, discussions, assigned readings
and observation of children, aims to equip each student with
this knowledge.
Junior Year

54 periods
25

3 semester

hours


3a. Principles of Education

(Kindergarten-Primary)
Following the work in psychology, this course in the senior
year takes up the educative process and develops definite
principles for the guidance of teachers.
These principles are
derived from three sources-biology,
psychology and sociology-and
they have reference to the growth and health of
pupils , their native equipment and capacities for learning,
and the objectives, content and general practices of public
school work. Classroom discussions and instruction are supplemented by readings from a variety of textbooks.
Students
are expected to apply the principles in their student-teaching
and to discuss intelligently exemplifications of the principles
that they observe.
Senior Year
36 periods
2 semester hours
3b. Principles of Education (Intermediate)
Following the work in psychology, this course in the senior
year takes up the educative process and develops definite principles for the guidance of teachers.
These principles
are
derived from three sources-biology,
psychology and sociology-and
they have reference to the growth and health of
pupils, their native equipment and capacities for learning,
and the objectives, content and general practices of public
school work. Classroom discussiQns and instruction are supplemented by readings from a variety of textbooks.
Students
are expected to apply the principles in their student-teaching
and to discuss intelligently exemplifications of the principles
that they observe.

Senior Year

54 periods

3 semester hours

4. School Management
This course attempts to assist students in analyzing, interpreting and solving the problems arising in connection with
their practice in the training schools and to set forth the underlying principles which justify modern classroom procedure.
Students are guided in the solution of their problems through
discussions, reference reading and actual classroom experience.
Senior Year
36 periods
2 semester hours

.

5. Professional Ethics
The purpose of this course is to help in the creation of
ideals, both personal and professional, and to make the student sensitive to acts not in keeping with these ideals. The
26

course provides for the consideration
of such topics as the
following:
1. What constitute the qualities of a profession?
2. Obligations of teachers as members of a profession.
3. The ethics of the profession covering the various relations of the teacher with pupils, parents, school officers,
community, etc.
4. Factors determining
the quality and extent of the
teacher's influence.
Senior Year

18 periods

1 semester

hour

6. · Rural Education
This course aims to acquaint the student with the problems
that are involved in rural school teaching, and to give her the
opportunity of observing how these problems are met. For
this purpose a rural training school is available.
By observation and participation
in this school the instruction in rural
school organization and management is motivated.
The course includes also the study of the various institutions and agencies which affect rural life and the relation of the
teacher to them.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.

Senior Year
·1.

72 periods

Kindergarten-Primary

3 semester hours

Education

The work of this course is basic to the needs of those preparing to teach in the kindergarten or in the primary grades.
It will deal with the underlying principles and the methods
of integrated
kindergarten-primary
education.
Particular
attention will be given to the technique of suitable activities
and units of instruction in these grades.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.
3 semester hours
Senior Year
72 periods
8. Observation and Participation
This course is designed to serve as a specific preparation
for student-teaching.
The student will observe and participate in the activities essential to the successful operation of
an elementary school. The student will progress gradually
from observation to participation in various classroom activities, such as the keeping of records, weighing children, play~round supervision, lesson planning, and limited group teachmg.

Junior Year

144 periods
27

4 semester hours

9.

Student-Teaching

During the second year each student is given opportunity
for three periods of continuous experience in the training
schools. Details of our plan for this year are given on pages
34 to 36.
As a final test of her ability to assume entire charge of a
typical classroom, each senior assumes complete responsibility
for teaching and managing a full room of pupils for a large
part of the period of final student-teaching.
Students by this
experience develop skill and confidence in teaching and in
handling classroom problems.
Senior Year

243 periods

PROFESSIONALIZED

21a.

Arithmetic

9 semester

SUBJECT-MATTER

hours

COURSES

(Kindergarten-Primary)

In this course consideration is given to methods of teaching
the subject matter of the arithmetic curriculum in grades orie,
two, and three. The following major topics will be included:
1. Specific and detailed subject matter and teaching material for kindergarten-primary
grades.
2. The best method for teaching arithmetic
in these
grades.
3. Standards of attainment.
4. Tests of accomplishment.
5. Results of experimental studies.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.
Senior Year
21b. Arithmetic

72 periods

3 semester

hours

(Intermediate)

This course deals with methods of presenting the subject
matter of the arithmetic curriculum in the intermediate grades.
The following major topics will be included:
1. Specific and detailed subject matter.
2. Methods of teaching.
3. Standards of attainment.
4. Tests of accomplishment.
5. Results of experimental studies.
There will be frequent demonstration lessons.
Senior Year

72 periods
28

3 semester

hours

22.

History and Civics

The aim of this course is twofold :
1. To increase the student's knowledge and appreciation
of the European background of American history and
the political, social and economic development of the
United States.
2. To provide the student with an adequate subject matter background for the teaching of citizenship through
a consideration of such topics as the meaning of and
necessity _for government, a detailed study of national,
state and local government in the United States, the
outstanding problems which our government has met
and solved, and some of the outstanding problems at
present facing our government.
An effort is made to present this course as one of a group
of social studies, to impress upon students its social objectives; and to develop ways and means by which teachers may
increasingly work toward this end in the schools.

72 periods

Junior Year
23.

4 semester

hours

Geography

This course is conducted for the purpose of establishing the
necessary geographic concepts and a knowledge of the outstanding facts and principles of geography.
The course includes a study of the continents and oceans, with particular
emphasis on North America. The elementary course of study
emphasizes geography as the interrelation
of man and his
environment.
This course emphasizes that same point of
view. It also endeavors to show the relationship of geography to the other social studies of the elementary school curriculum.
Junior Year
24a.

72 periods

4 semester hours

Teaching the Social Studies (Kindergarten-Primary)

Students in this course will continue the study of the social
studies-history,
citizenship
and geography-with
principal emphasis upon the proper organization of teaching units
based upon children's interests, and upon other aspects of
method. The possibilities connected with a unification of the
social studies will be emphasized.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.
Senior Year

54 periods
29



2 semester

hours

24b.

Teaching

the Social Studies (Intermediate)

Students in this course will continue the study of the social
studies - history, citizenship
and geography - with principal emphasis upon the proper organization of teaching units
based upon children's interests, and upon other aspects of
method. The possibilities connected with a unification of the
social studies will be emphasized.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.
Senior Year
25.

90 periods

4 semester

hours

Oral and Written English

The course in oral and written English considers both the
personal and professional needs of the student in this field.
Instruction will be given in composition, grammar, spelling,
story-telling, dramatization and voice improvement.
Junior Year

72 periods

4 semester hours

26a. Oral and Written English (Kindergarten-Primary)
This course provides for an intensive treatment of the subject matter of the kindergarten and primary grades; methods
of teaching the subject; sources and use of material; standards
and measures of attainment.
There will be frequent demonstration lessons.
Senior Year
54 periods
2 semester hours
26b. Oral and Written English (Intermediate)
This course provides for an intensive treatment of the subject matter of the intermediate grades; methods of teaching
the subject; sources and use of materials; standards and measures of attainment.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.

Senior Year

54 periods

2 semester hours

27. Literature
This course has two principal objectives:
(1) to broaden
the student's acquaintance
with and appreciation
of good
literature; (2) to acquaint the student with the best materials
in the field of children's literature.
Taste, appreciation and
discriminating
judgment are fostered.
Students are led to
choose those materials which, in addition to having a strong
appeal to children, have well recognized literary value.

Junior Year

54 periods
30

3 semester

hours

\
28a. Reading and Literature (Kindergarten-Primary)
This course is offered for students preparing to teach in the
kindergarten or in Grades I-III.
The course provides for an
intensive study of the Course of Study in Reading including
Literature as it concerns the kindergarten and the primary
grades. The following topics are discussed:
1. Selection and organization of subject matter.
2. General methods, type lessons and type suggestions
for conducting reading and literature exercises in these
grades.
3. The application of psychology to the teaching of this
subject.
4. Tests of accomplishment
and standards of achievement.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.
Senior Year

72 periods

3 semester hours

28b. Reading and Literature (Intermediate)
This course is offered for students preparing to teach in the
intermediate
grades.
The course provides for an intensive
study of the Course of Study in Reading including Literature
as it concerns the intermediate grades. The following topics
are discussed :
1. Selection and organization of subject matter.
2. General methods, type lessons and type suggestions
for conducting reading and literature exercises in these
grades.
3. The application of psychology to the teaching of this
subject.
4. Tests of accomplishment
and standards of achievement.
There will be frequent demonstration
lessons.
Senior Year
29.

72 periods

3 semester

hours

Library Technique

The library course in the normal school is intended only as
a beginning.
It aims, in cooperation with the English department, to arouse in students a desire for better reading, to
acquaint them with books and aid them in their effective use.
The course aiqis, in other words, to develop interests and
tastes which are part of the well-read, discriminating teacher.
31

I
This course teaches the use of the card catalogue and the
making of simple cards; it acquaints the students with the
Dewey decimal system; it teaches the make-up and care of
books, with some instruction in mending.
It urges the reading of magazines and the listing of material available for
school work. It sets before the student the advantages of a
definite cooperation with the local librarian.
Students familiarize themselves, through actual use, with all available reference material and its application to the various types of school
work.
Junior Year

18 periods

1 semester

hour

30. Nature Study
Nature study in normal schools purposes to give prospective teachers ability to initiate and develop nature interests in
elementary school pupils.
The subjects covered are trees,
shrubs, flowers, birds, insects, mammals, water-life, seedless
plants, stones, weather and stars.
The course consists of field trips for nature observations and
recognitions;
stories and poems about nature; songs; drawings; cut paper work; modeling and construction of scenes in
nature; dramatization
of nature stories; simple life histories;
nature games and activities;
and lesson plans suitable for
lower grade children.
For teaching upper grade children the course continues the
field trips on nature trails; additional life histories and recognitions; information, methods and devices for group work
developing nature topics through problems;
how man is
affected by nature; content and teaching plans for nature
lessons; nature exhibits; and handwork suitable for upper
grades.

Junior Year
31.

72 periods

3 semester hours

Physical Education

The aims of this course are :
1. To correct the physical defects and weaknesses of individual students as revealed by a thorough medical and
physical examination.
2. To develop skill in coordinating the mind and body.
3. To develop an appreciation of the value of recreation.
4. To prepare each student to carry out the physical education program as outlined in the Connecticut Manual
of Physical Education for Elementary Grades.
Junior Year
72 periods
2 semester hours
32

32.

Health and Physical

Education

This course aims to prepare teachers to carry out a well
organized program of health and physical education in elementary schools.
Instruction is given in the subject matter
underlying a proper presentation of personal and community
hygiene. Attention is given to conditions and influences tending to impair the health of school children and to means for
preventing or improving these conditions.
The importance
of a close coordination of the health instruction with the physical activities program is stressed.
Instruction
is given in
the proper organization
of the physical activities program.
The Connecticut Manual of Physical Education for Elementary
Grades and Health Education Bulletins I-VI I will be used as guides
in this aspect of the course.
There will be frequent demonstration lessons.
Senior Year ·
33.

72 periods

3 semester hours

Art

Art courses in the elementary school offer varied opportunity for pupils to gain skill with their hands through using and
making things. At the same time they teach pupils to recognize and care for better pictures, printing, furniture, clothing,
etc.; to prize neat and orderly work; to be careful of their own
appearance and things under their control.
It is an ultimate
aim to raise the st.andards of what is generally considered good
taste in matters of personal or community appearance.
The
art work offers many opportunities
for school projects and
may be helpfully coordinated
with several school courses.
Normal school courses are designed to prepare students to
conduct work of this nature in the elementary schools. Instruction is given in drawing, painting, lettering, and various
forms of handwork,
together
with art appreciation
and
·
methods of teaching pupils.
Junior Year
108 periods
3 semester hours
34.

Music

The music courses in the normal school are designed to inculcate an appreciation of good music and to impart the knowledge and develop the ability necessary to teach music courses
in the elementary schools.
Students are taught the fundamentals of reading music and of singing in a pleasant voice.
Instruction is given in music appreciation, the teaching of rote
songs and type lessons in music, melody writing and leading
choral singing.
The courses are supplemented by such out33

side act1v1ties as making a rote song book, forming
club, or preparation of an operetta.
Junior Year

35.

72 periods

a glee

2 semester hours

Handwriting

This course has two principal objectives: (1) to provide an
opportunity for students to improve their own handwriting
ability, both on manuscript and on the blackboard; (2) to give
instruction in appro ved methods of teaching writing to children. It is expected in connection with this course that students will bring their own writing up to a standard of 80 on
the Ayres Handwriting
Scale for both manuscript and blackboard writing.
The style of writing shall conform to that in
use in the practice schools.
Senior Year

36 periods

1 semester

hour

TRAINING

Each student spends one-quarter of her entire time in the
training schools, engaged in observation and practice under
actual schoolroom conditions.
This work is carried on in twenty-eight
public school
rooms of the town of Danbury, which is under normal school
administration.
Sixteen of these are at Balmforth A venue
school and ten at Locust A venue school. The rural schools
at Mill Plain and Miry Brook offer opportunity for training
under actual rural school conditions.
The work of these
schools is under the direction of the head of the education department at the normal school, and the work of normal school
students in training is in charge of the director of training .
Each room in the training schools is regularly in charge of one
teacher, who also serves as instructor in teaching and management to the students temporarily assigned to her room.
The nineteen weeks of training are grouped into six
periods, beginning with the second month and scattered
throughout their entire course. Three of these occur during
the junior year, the first two being each two weeks in length
and the third about one month.
The three periods of the
senior year are each about one month long. The months set
apart for each class in training and the stage that the students
34

should reach in each period are here given as they are planned
for 1930-31, though this is subject to change.

Weeks
12

3 4

Weeks
12

3 4

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Stage IV
Senior X
Senior X

Stage I
Junior X
Junior Y

Stage IV
Senior Y
Senior Y

Stage II
Junior X
Junior Y

Stage V
Senior X
Senior X

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

Stage V
Senior Y
Senior Y

Stage VI
Senior X
Senior X

Stage VI
Senior Y
Senior Y

May
Stage III
Junior X
Junior X

June
Stage III
Junior Y
Junior Y

In this schedule X means divisions A and B, and Y indicates C and D. The training "months" do not coincide exactly
with the calendar months whose names they bear; with occasional exceptions, each begins on a Monday and is four weeks
long.
The work of each stage of training is planned so as to
focus the student's attention upon one phase of teaching or
management.
In the first stage the student takes care of
mechanical details in the room, and learns how to take useful
observations.
In the second stage the emphasis is upon lesson
planning, without responsibility
for the illustrative material
and devices. During the third stage the student prepares her
own illustrative material, and also arranges the blackboard
work.
She is expected to have entire management
of the
whole class independently.
For the fourth stage the added
duties include the management
of study and recreation
periods. In the fifth stage the student constructs a daily plan
sheet showing the work to be done in each subject, with reference to the needs of the class and the requirements of the
course of study.
During the sixth stage the student is expected to prepare each day's work as though the entire responsibility for the room were hers. In the early part of
training the student is responsible for the care of physical sur roundings in the classroom; as the amount of teaching is increased, these duties are correspondingly
diminished.
Each student spends a portion of every clay in observing
classes taught by the critic teacher. A report of one or more
of these classes is submitted to the teacher at the close of the
35

day. This report states the purpose of the lesson and the
steps taken in accomplishing the purpose, together with notes
on special features which the student may have been asked to
look for-such
as method of gaining attention, activities of
pupils, etc.
Toward the end of each day the student has a brief conference with her critic teacher, in which she receives such
notes on her work through the day as will enable her to improve or strengthen it in the future.
She is also given opportunity to inquire about any phase of the work which she does
not clearly understand.
The teaching required of each student in the first stage is
the tutoring of individuals;
in the second stage she teaches
small groups daily, for which she is required to .make detailed
plans; in the third stage she makes out full plans for the
entire class; in the fourth, one of the assigned lessons is
planned in detail and the others in the form of an outline;
in the fifth stage rather full outlines are made for -the several
lessons; in the sixth stage a teacher's set of outlines is prepared for the day.
The amount of teaching done by the students is gradually
increased as they gain experience.
In the first stage, their
average teaching is twenty minutes a day; in the second,
twenty-five minutes per day; in the third, forty-five minutes;
in the fourth, fifty minutes plus one continuous quarter day
toward the end; in the fifth, about one hour plus one entire
half day; in the final stage the student must be able to take
full charge of the room at any moment and continue it indefinitely.
By arrangement
of the training
periods at intervals
throughout
the two years' normal course it is intended that
classroom study and practical experience shall stimulate and
supplement each other to the advantage of both. Every student is able to gain experience in at least four representative
grades and under different teachers.
Each has at least one
week's training in a rural school; graduates in 1930 will have
had each two weeks.
Beginning at stage four, a student must have satisfactorily met the specific requirements
of each stage before
being allowed to advance to the next.
36

STUDENTS
Graduates
Florence Louise Anderson
Karin W alborg Anderson
Blanche Bisnovich
Da vida Martha Blakeslee
Gladys Bradshaw
Dorothy Marie Burnie
Mary Margaret Butler
Athena Marie Caloyianis
Mary Agnes Carr
Grace Margaret Collins
Eunice Sophia Curtiss
Mildred King Davis
Elisabeth Dederick
Helen Kathryn Deegan
Mae Elizabeth Dougherty
Gertrude Christine Dullard
Olive Marcella Finch
Rita Marie FitzMaurice
Frances Anna Fleming
Julia Lee Geckle
Anna Helen Gelbogis
Marie Isabel Genovese
Helen Margaret Gereg
Celia Sylvia Gilden
Edith Glazer
Louise Wilhemina Goergen
Olga ·Goodhue
Thelma Claire Gorman
Mary Rose Grgach
Ruth Claire Heidel
Irma Pauline Hermanson
Mary Lois Johnston
Mary Kadlecik
Margaret Estelle Lathrop
Vella May Leslie
Blanche May Levinson
Rose Londa
Helen Loshin
Virginia Louise MacLeod
Etta Marcus
Loretta Ann Marshall
Josephine Louise Maye
Candita Catherine lVIa;;izarella
S. Elizabeth McDonough
Julia Frances McGarry
Florence Alberta McN ally
Gracia Elizabeth Mealia
Jean Leslie Miller
Norma Grace Miller
Marion Scott Moen
Madeline Morgan

1929
Naugatuck
New Milford
Waterbury
Litchfield
Danbury
Danbury
Waterbury
Stamford
Torrington
East Norwalk
Sandy Hook
Southbury
West Cornwall
Naugatuck
Naugatuck
Naugatuck
South Norwalk
Waterbury
Danbury
Sandy Hook
Waterbury
Stamford
Brookfield
Waterbury
South Norwalk
Danbury ·
New Canaan
Waterbury
Danbury
South Norwalk
Bridgeport
Stamford
Fairfield
Bethel
Woodbury
Waterbury
Danbury
Danbury
Glenbrook
Danbury
New Canaan
Botsford
Waterbury
Danbury
Fairfield
South Norwalk
Torrington
New Milford
New Milford
Jamaica, L. I.
Danbury

37

,.

Canaan
Fairfield
Stamford
Danbury
Stamford
Westport
Danbury
Stamford
Waterbury
Bethel
Stamford
Shelton
South Norwalk
Danbury
Danbury
Waterbury
Stamford
Stamford
Stamford
Canaan
South Norwalk
Bridgeport
East Port Chester
South Norwalk
Waterbury
Stamford
Greenwich

:Mary Elizabeth Noble
Florence Louise Noy
Sara Frances Nurnberg
Arlyne Marita O'Boy
Eleanor Rose O'Connor
Lillian Henrietta Odell
Katherine Marie O'Hara
Rose Marie Paolini
Mary Elizabeth Phelan
Marion Haynes Platt
Adeline Olive Poltrack
Grace Adele Rambo
Gertrude Rosenberg
Theresa Jeannette Rotella
Margaret Marita Ryan
Mary Elisabeth Schieffer
Sydney Sherman
Grace Marie Smith
Marjorie Joan Smith
Emma Howell Stanton
Dorothy Dix Stevens
Ida Stoller
Lillian Senja Suojanen
Hannah Bebe Tobin
Mildred Ursula Walsh
Mabelle Waters
Charlotte Betty Wolff

SENIOR YEAR
Class of 1930
Name

Anderson, Estelle C.
Beaujon, Eugenie J.
Beers, Emma T.
Benya, Helen A
Betts, Lois W.
Bowerman, Gertrude M.
Bowman, Shirley I.
Brennan. Veronica M.
Budd, Beatrice C.
Camp, Agnes N.
Carter, Ruth
Chichester, Mildred E.
Collins, Ethel M.
DelMonte, Rose C.
DeSalvo, Anna V.
Devine, Helen C.
Dickinson, Eleanor H.
Dolan, Frances M.
Dower, Marion E.
Downs, Alice C.
Dunn, Margret R.
Durkin, Helen A.
Dusha, Helena E.
Dzialo, Mary V.

Home

Address

Danbury

Address

Danbury, R. F. D. #2, Box 66
Canaan
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 36 Wooster Heights
Brookfield Center, Whisconier Hill
Danbury, R. F. D. #5
Torrington, 316 Litchfield Street
29 Homestead A venue
Rowayton, Rowayton Ave.
Fairfield Hall
Litchfield, Lake St.
50 Jefferson Ave.
Danbury, 21 James Street
South Kent
Fairfield Hall
Greenwich, 168 West Putnam Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Bridgeport, 714 North Ave.
164 White St.
Bethel, 21 Grassy Plain Street
Danbury, 13 Griffing Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, Newfield Ave.
Norwalk, 12 Eversley St.
Fairfield Hall
South Britain, Box 98
Fairfield Hall
New Milford, Sterling Place Fairfield Hall
Fairfield Hall
Canaan, Box 421
Stevenson, Box 135
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 91 Turner Ave.
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 6 Whitlock Street
Danbury, 143 West Street
Torrington, 694 North Main Street
Fairfield Hall

38

Name

Ilome Aclcl1-css

Eisenberger, Marietta
Frey, Luella M.
Friedman, Ethel M.
Genito, Lisentrenia J.
Goldstein, Frances
Graham, Mary E.
Hanna, Emily
Hoffman, Dorothy M.
Hoth, Emma K.
Jerman, Jean M.
J uh!, Edna C.
Kane, Genevieve V.
Kiley, Julia M.
Lambert, Doris
Lawlor, J\[argaret M.
Lee, Miriam H.
Lcvandauskas, Helen M.
McCarthy, Mary J.
McVcigh, Mary T.
Moshier, Cornelia I.
Murphy, Margaret M.
Murphy, Mary T.
Nichols, Genevieve M.
Obuchowski, Mary J.
O'Neill, Anna R.
Parks, Louise
Pfeiffer, Clara
Phillips, J\Iargaret

W.

Pitcher, Mildred
Quane, Mary F.
Rabinovitz, Mae
Ryan, Catherine F.
Sharrow, Florence I.
Smith, Josephine C.
Spada, Naomi E.
Stevens, Betty G.
Tomi, Lydia M.
Vaccaro, Jennie M.
Vasso, Agnes L.
Verrastro, J\[arie
Vogel, Florence
\i\Tallace, Kathryn B
\i\Tebb, Laura J.
White, J\Jargaret S.
Wied!, Margaret M.
Zimmerman, Barbara

L.

Danbury Address

Bethel, 10 South Street
Torrington, 128 Pearl Street
29 Homestead A venue
Stamford, 100 Clinton Avenue
12 New St.
Lakeville
Fairfield Hall
South Norwalk, 17 Chestnut Street
Fairfield Hall
Bridgeport, 56 Porter St.
65 Osborne St.
Bethel, 5 Elizabeth Street
Riverside, Knoll Street
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, R. F. D. #1
Fairfield Hall
Cos Cob, Sinawoy Road
Fairfield Hall
East Port Chester, 131 Henry St.
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 16 Library Place
New Canaan, Weed Street
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, 140 Ludlow St.
Fairfield Hall
Waterbury, 432 Wilson St.
Fairfield Hall
Norwalk, 163 East Rocks Road
50 Locust Avenue
Naugatuck, 25 Aetna St.
Fairfield Hall
Greenwich, 225 Greenwich Avenue
Fairfield Hall
\i\Tatertown, Box 237
164 White St.
Fairfield Ilall
Waterbury, R. F. D. #2
Ridgefield, R. F. D. #1
Waterbury, 48 Bridge St.
Fairfield Hall
New Canaan, 246 South Main Street
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, 235 Greenwich Avenue
Fairlield Hall
Canaan, Box 402
Fairfield Hall
Fairfield Hall
Glenbrcok, 16 Glen Terrac2
Stamford, Cowan Avenue
Fairfield Hall
South Norwalk, 38 West Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Sharon
Fairlield Hall
Waterbury, 55 Pemberton Street
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 15 Osborne Street
32 Osborne St.
Waterbury, R. F. D #4
Fairfield Hall
North Woodbury
Stamford, Blachley Road
Fairfield Hall
Monroe, Stepney Depot
Fairfield Hall
Waterbury, 175 Chestnut Aven11e
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, R. F. D. #3, Box 33A
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, 45 Stephen St.
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 306 Hillside St. Fairfield Hall
v\Taterbury, 33 High St.
Fairfield Hall
South Norwalk, 56 Putnam A venue
Fairfie ld Hall
Bridgeport, 305 Seaview Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 16 Madison Avenue
Greenwich, 94 Field Point Road
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 8 East Pearl Street
Danbury, 30 Davis Street
39

Special Class
Name

Davies, M. Linda
Lyons, Josephine M.
McFaddin, Margaret N.
Nilan, Margaret M.
O'Leskey, Katherine 0.
Perell, Dorothy

Home Address

Danbury

Address

Ridgefield, 10 Market Street
Norwalk, 34 Horton St.
Fairfield Hall
Glenbrook, 48 Fairmount Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Waterbury, 25 Howard St. 2 Wildman St.
Waterbury, 92 Wayland Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, 120 Lafayette St.
Fairfield Hall

JUNIOR YEAR
Class of 1931
Name

Angrisani, Ida M.
Bennett, Sylvia B.
Billyou, Mary L.
Britto, Helen L.
Bryce, Isella M.
Buzzi, Mary L.
Calciolari, Cirene
Calderbank, Deborah J.
Calhoun, Gertrude E.
Caputo, Sylvia L.
Colangelo, Jennie M.
Collins, Winifred B.
Creagh, Alice T.
Curran, Mary G.
Curtis, Arline A.
Daniell, Beatrice
Davis, Leona R.
DeBarberi, Victoria R.
Dent, Madelyn 0 .
Durfee, Frances R.
Ellerin, Emily
Ericson, Elinor M.
Fabro, Alice
Fennell, Madlyn E.
Flaherty, Margaret A.
Fleming, Margaret M.
French, S. Evelyn
Gannon, Margaret M.
Geriak, Ann M.
Graziani, Viola
Gumpper, Mary P.

Home Address

D"anhury Address

Ridgefi eld, Box 134
Danbury, 3 Bennett Place
Danbury, 12 Town Hill Avenue
Bethel, 9 Hickok Avenue
Norwalk, 31 Isaac St.
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 586 South Main Street
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 94 Lafayette Street
Fairfield Hall
Sound Beach, Highview Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Springdale, Knickerbocker Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, Windsor Road
10 Summitt St.
Torrington, 181 Lafayette Street
Fairfield Hall
Noroton, Near Water Lane 10 Summitt St.
Ridgefield, 199 Main Street
Danbury, 29 Washington Avenue
New Haven, 375 Winthrop Avenue
SOLocust A venue
Glenbrook, 15 Brooklawn Ave.
Fairfield Hall
Naugatuck, 154 High St.
8 Union Ave.
Bridgeport, 2099 Main St.
182 White St.
Danbury, 285 White Street
Kent, R. F. D. ,#1
91 Osborne St .
Norwalk, 78 Main Street
184 White St.
Norwalk, 19 Harriet Street
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 127 French St.
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 131 Triangle Street
Norwalk, 10 Harriet St.
184 White St.
Waterbury, 565 East Main Street
65 Osborne Street
Trumbull, Box 17
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, 7 Emmett St.
16 Meadow St.
North Stamford, Intervale Road
16 Meadow Street
Torrington. 23 Casson Avenue
3 Homestead A venue
Waterbury, 5 Magill St.
65 Osborne St .

40

Name

Harkness, Helen I.
Heuschkel, Elizabeth A.
Howard, Mary D.
Huck, Florence M.
Hunihan, Frances E.
Irwin, Mary A.
Isham, Estella S.
Keefe, Marv W.
Keegan, Anna
Keeler, Grace
Keifer, Dorothy L.
Kellogg, Phebe J.
Koskinen Evelyn A.
Lange, Mildred D.
Larson, Frances
Lee, Arlene M.
Lewis, Dorothy M.
Lillis, Marian C.
Lindberg, Esther E.
Lipkowitz, Helen E.
Londa, Harriette
Lynagh, Marion G.
Lyon, Merah F.
Maher, Margaret M.
Manion, Florence A.
Manning, Viola B.
Marcy, Ruth E.
McCormick, Alice K.
Michaels, Ruth
Miner, Josephine D.
Mitchell, Genevieve M .
Mitchell, Madeline E.
Moyer, Muriel G.
Mucke, Ida D.
Murphy, Eleanor G.
Nunzarro, Zuleme M.
Oberg, Fanny E.
O'Connor, Evelyn
Pendergast, Helen L.
Perun, Mildred
Pieragnoli, Rena M.
Prucha, Grace H.
Reilly, Mary F.
Reilly, Patricia R.
Richter, Edna M.
Rowe, Evelyn M.
Ryan, Lucy H.
Salvucci, Rose M.

Home Address

Danbury

Address

Danbury, 80 Locust Avenue
Bridgeport, 780 Cleveland Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Waterbury, 1544 Baldwin St. Fairfield Hall
Westport, 26 Gorham Ave.
Fairfield Hall
Southbury
Fairfield Hall
East Norwalk, l Charles St. Fairfield Hall
Woodbury, R. F. D. # l
Fairfield Hall
Norwalk, 22 Woodbury Avenue
SU Locust Avenue
Waterbury, 596 South Main Street
65 Osborne Street
Norwa lk, 10 Eversley St.
Fairfield Hall
New Milford, Grove Street
Danbury, Wooster Heights
Roxbury
Fairfield Hall
Long Hill, Box 2
Fairfield Hall
Bethel, Hoyt's Hill
Danbury, 32 Main Street
Danbury, 6 vVestville Avenue
Danbury, 40 Town Hill Avenue
Bridgeport, 211 Calhoun Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Glenbrook, 15 Cowing Place 47 Maple Ave .
Danbury, 16 Moss Avenue
Glenville
Fairfield Hall
Bethel, 5 Milwaukee Avenue
Stamford, Stafford Park
164 White St.
Bethel, 87 Grassy Plain Street
Washington Depot
12 Library Place
Falls Village
91 Osborne St.
Norwalk, 16 Belden Ave.
Fairfield Hall
South Norwalk, 8 Raymond Street
10 Moss A venue
Stamford, 46 Leeds St.
164 White St.
Ridgefield, 7 Fairview Street
Ridgefield, 7 Fairview Street
Danbury, 42 North Street
New Britain, 38 Summer St. 21 Second Ave.
Danbury, 164 White Street
Georgetown
Stamford, 143 Myrtle Ave.
182 White St.
Waterbury, 83 Fairlawn Ave. Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 7 Cottage Street
Bethel, R. F. D. #2, Box 79
Bethel, 27 Reservoir Street
Stamford, 32 Shippan Avenue Extension
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, 52 Lincoln A venue
92 Locust A venue
Stamford, 53 Maple Ave.
Fairfield Hall
Norwalk, 21 Hill Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Norwalk, 16 Spring Hill Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Bridgeport, 246 Island Brook Avenue
Fairfield Hall
Bridgeport, 224 Wheeler Avenue
SOLocust A venue
41

Name

Schulz, Rita
Severini, Sistina J.
Skasko, Anna D.
Smith, Harriet E.
Southgate, Viola A.
Stapleton, Teresa M.
Stewart, Grace
Sweeney, Ann C.
Thomas, Katherine L.
Thornton, Evelyn L.
Todisco, Mary
Troisi, Rose G.
Valeri, Clotilde F.
Walker, Lillian P.
Walsh, Margaret R.
Walti, Elsa M.
Wilcox, Hazel E.
Williamson, Elizabeth
Wixted, Mary E.
Yikulavish, Julia V.
Zeiner, Virginia L.

Home Address

Danbury

Address

Danbury, 16 Blane Street
Ridgefield, 181 Main Street
Danbury, 01 Fairfield Avenue
Fairfield Hall
New Milford, Northville
Danbury, 26 Park Avenue
Fairfie ld Hall
Waterbury, 12 Cassett St.
Norwalk, Part rick Ave.
Fairfield Hall
Waterbury, 95 Easton Ave. 65 Osborne St.
Fairfield Hall
Stamford, 15 Map le Ave.
Fairfield Hall
Bridgeport, R. F. D. #3
Bridgeport, 342 Main Street
3 Homestead A venue
East Port Chester, 144 Pine Street
Fairfield Hall
Danbury, 17 High Street
Bridgeport, 29 Roosevelt St. 50 Locust Ave.
Torrington, 33 Taylor St.
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 354 New Litchfield Street
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 149 Mallette Street
Fairfield Hall
Torrington, 751 Migeon Avenue
11 Meadow St.
Danbury, 014 South Street
Naugatuck, 49 South Main Street
92 Locust A venue
Torrington, 36 High Street
Fairfield Hall

42

ATTENDANCE
ATTENDANCE

BY TOWNS

s

Bethel
Bridgeport
Brookfield
Canaan
Danbury
Darien
Greenwich
Kent
Litchfield
Monroe
Naugatuck
New Britain
New Canaan
New Haven
New Milford
Norwalk

Ridgefield
Roxbury
Salisbury
Sharon
Southbury
Stamford
Torrington
Trumbull
Washington
Waterbury
\Vatertown
Westport
\Vilton
Woodbury

10
1
4

31
1
9
2
1
2
3
2
1
3
19

7

2

24
16
3
1

16
1
l

1
2

. 176

Total

ATTENDANCE

BY COUNTIES

Fairfield
Hartford
Litchfield
New Haven

120
1
33
22

Total

176
SUMMARY

Seniors
Juniors
Total
Pupils in training

76
100
schools

43

176
910

,

THE

LIBRARY